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Optimal Military Spending, Trade and Stochastic Economic Growth


  • Deng-Shan Wang

    (CEMA, Central University of Finance and Economics)

  • Yan Wang

    (CEMA, Central University of Finance and Economics)

  • Yifang Liu

    (School of Economics, Central University of Finance and Economics)

  • Heng-fu Zou

    (CEMA, Central University of Finance and Economics)


In this paper, based on dynamic programming we investigate the military spending, trade and wealth accumulation in a stochastic endogenous growth model. For the Cobb-Dauglas utility function, explicit solutions of the optimal problem in the home country are obtained, and the optimal consumptions of domestic goods and foreign goods, the share of domestic capital stock and foreign bond holdings are derived. The comparative dynamic analysis shows that when intertemporal substitution in consumption is relative elastic, the lower the foreign military spending, the higher variance of foreign military spending and lower volatility in the return of capital or bonds will result in lower consumption ratio and higher economic growth rate.

Suggested Citation

  • Deng-Shan Wang & Yan Wang & Yifang Liu & Heng-fu Zou, 2009. "Optimal Military Spending, Trade and Stochastic Economic Growth," CEMA Working Papers 373, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cuf:wpaper:373

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Abu-Bader, Suleiman & Abu-Qarn, Aamer S., 2003. "Government expenditures, military spending and economic growth: causality evidence from Egypt, Israel, and Syria," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(6-7), pages 567-583, September.
    2. van der Ploeg, F & de Zeeuw, A J, 1990. "Perfect Equilibrium in a Model of Competitive Arms Accumulation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 31(1), pages 131-146, February.
    3. Robert S. Pindyck & Andrés Solimano, 1993. "Economic Instability and Aggregate Investment," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1993, Volume 8, pages 259-318 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Landau, Daniel, 1993. "The economic impact of military expenditures," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1138, The World Bank.
    5. Deger, Saadet & Sen, Somnath, 1983. "Military expenditure, spin-off and economic development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1-2), pages 67-83.
    6. Gong, Liutang & Zou, Heng-fu, 2003. "Military spending and stochastic growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 153-170, October.
    7. Michael D. Intriligator & D. L. Brito, 1976. "Formal Models of Arms Races," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 2(1), pages 77-88, February.
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    More about this item


    Military spending; Wealth accumulation; Trade; Foreign bond holdings; Stochastic economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General


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