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Gangs and Crime Deterrence

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Abstract

A framework is developed in which the formation of gangs --- the criminal market structure --- is endogenous. We examine the impact of crime deterrence in this framework. It is shown that for a given gang structure, an increase in deterrence reduces criminal output. However, under identifiable circumstances, an increase in deterrence can also lead to an increase in the number of competing criminal gangs and to an increase in total illegal output. Nous étudions un monde dans lequel la formation de gangs criminels est endogène, l'ensemble des gangs criminels constituant la structure de marché d'un bien illégal. Nous étudions l'impact de la dissuasion du crime dans un tel cadre. Pour une structure de marché donnée, accroître la dissuasion tend à réduire la production du bien illégal. Cependant, dans certains cas, accroître la dissuasion peut conduire a un accroissement du nombre de gangs criminels dans le marché et donc, à une plus grande concurrence. Il est alors possible que la production du bien illégal augmente.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdalla Mansour & Nicolas Marceau & Steeve Mongrain, 2001. "Gangs and Crime Deterrence," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 138, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
  • Handle: RePEc:cre:crefwp:138
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    Cited by:

    1. Poret, Sylvaine & Tejedo, Cyril, 2006. "Law enforcement and concentration in illicit drug markets," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 99-114, March.
    2. Sylvaine Poret, 2006. "L'impact des politiques répressives sur l'offre de drogues illicites. Une revue de la littérature théorique," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 57(5), pages 1065-1091.
    3. Hauret, Laetitia & Langlais, Eric & Sonntag, Carine, 2009. "On the deterrent effect of individual versus collective liability in criminal organizations," MPRA Paper 14762, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Gamba, Astrid & Immordino, Giovanni & Piccolo, Salvatore, 2018. "Corruption, organized crime and the bright side of subversion of law," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 79-88.
    5. Antonio Acconcia & Giovanni Immordino & Salvatore Piccolo & Patrick Rey, 2014. "Accomplice Witnesses and Organized Crime: Theory and Evidence from Italy," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 116(4), pages 1116-1159, October.
    6. Wallace, Rodrick & Fullilove, Robert E., 2014. "State policy and the political economy of criminal enterprise: mass incarceration and persistent organized hyperviolence in the USA," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 17-31.
    7. Kyriakos C. Neanidis & Maria Paola Rana, 2014. "Entrepreneurs, Risk Aversion and Dynamic Firms," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 190, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    8. Adam Jacobsson & Alberto Naranjo, 2009. "Counter-intuitive effects of domestic law enforcement policies in the United States," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 323-343, November.
    9. Motta, Alberto & Burlando, Alfredo, 2007. "Self reporting reduces corruption in law enforcement," MPRA Paper 5332, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 23 Jun 2007.
    10. Panu Poutvaara & Mikael Priks, 2007. "Unemployment and Gang Crime: Could Prosperity Backfire?," CESifo Working Paper Series 1944, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Kugler, Maurice & Verdier, Thierry & Zenou, Yves, 2005. "Organized crime, corruption and punishment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(9-10), pages 1639-1663, September.
    12. Long, Iain W., 2014. "The Storm Before the Calm? Adverse Effects of Tackling Organised Crime," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2014/8, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    13. Chang, Juin-Jen & Lu, Huei-Chung & Wang, Ping, 2013. "Search for a theory of organized crimes," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 130-153.
    14. Astrid, Gamba & Giovanni, Immordino & Salvatore, Piccolo, 2016. "Organized Crime and the Bright Side of Subversion of Law," Working Papers 336, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised 17 May 2016.
    15. Omar Mahmoud, Toman & Trebesch, Christoph, 2009. "The economic drivers of human trafficking: micro-evidence from five Eastern European countries," Kiel Working Papers 1480, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    16. Antony W. Dnes & Nuno Garoupa, 2010. "Behavior, Human Capital and the Formation of Gangs," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(4), pages 517-529, November.
    17. Sylvaine Poret, 2005. "Structure verticale d'un réseau de distribution de drogues illicites et politique répressive optimale," Recherches économiques de Louvain, De Boeck Université, vol. 71(4), pages 391-412.
    18. Panu Poutvaara & Mikael Priks, 2011. "Unemployment and gang crime: can prosperity backfire?," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 259-273, September.
    19. Salvatore Piccolo & Giovanni Immordino, 2012. "Optimal Accomplice-Witnesses Regulation under Asymmetric Information," CSEF Working Papers 304, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    20. Poret, Sylvaine, 2009. "An optimal anti-drug law enforcement policy," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 221-228, September.
    21. Long, Iain W., 2013. "Recruitment to Organised Crime," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2013/10, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    22. repec:bla:manchs:v:85:y:2017:i:5:p:541-576 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Naranjo, Alberto J., 2010. "Spillover effects of domestic law enforcement policies," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 265-275, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    criminal gangs; formation; crime deterrence;

    JEL classification:

    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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