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Time Based Competition and Innovation

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  • Thesmar, David
  • Thoenig, Mathias

Abstract

By choosing their organizations, firms trade-off productive efficiency and time spent in implementing innovation. We embed such a productivity/reactivity trade-off in a growth model with creative destruction. We first highlight the specific impact of time in firm competition: in addition to weighing costs and benefits of late adoption, firms use time as a strategic variable through the possibility of overtaking their competitors. Due to this very specificity of time competition, multiple equilibria may emerge: when firms adopt quickly, their stock market valuation is larger, and they innovate more and produce less. Moreover, the IT revolution is shown to favour quick implementation via a general equilibrium feedback on organizational choice.

Suggested Citation

  • Thesmar, David & Thoenig, Mathias, 2002. "Time Based Competition and Innovation," CEPR Discussion Papers 3293, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3293
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy, 1994. "The Division of Labor, Coordination Costs, and Knowledge," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 299-322 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth through Creative Destruction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(2), pages 323-351, March.
    3. Mathias Dewatripont & Patrick Bolton, 1994. "The firm as a communication network," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/9595, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    4. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2002. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization, and the Demand for Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 339-376.
    5. Saint-Paul Gilles, 1993. "Technological Flexibility and the Macroeconomic Environment," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 78-106, March.
    6. Philippe Aghion & Mathias Dewatripont & Patrick Rey, 1999. "Competition, Financial Discipline and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(4), pages 825-852.
    7. Patrick Bolton & Mathias Dewatripont, 1994. "The Firm as a Communication Network," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(4), pages 809-839.
    8. David, Paul A, 1990. "The Dynamo and the Computer: An Historical Perspective on the Modern Productivity Paradox," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 355-361, May.
    9. Masahiko Aoki, 2013. "Horizontal vs. Vertical Information Structure of the Firm," Chapters,in: Comparative Institutional Analysis, chapter 5, pages 57-58 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2000. "Beyond Computation: Information Technology, Organizational Transformation and Business Performance," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 23-48, Fall.
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    12. Milgrom, Paul & Roberts, John, 1990. "The Economics of Modern Manufacturing: Technology, Strategy, and Organization," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(3), pages 511-528, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. David Fairris & Philippe Askenazy, 2010. "Works Councils and Firm Productivity in France," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 209-229, September.
    2. Elisa Rancati, 2005. "Global Markets and Time-Based Competition," Symphonya. Emerging Issues in Management, University of Milano-Bicocca, issue 2 Over-Su.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    competition; firm organisation; innovation; reactivity;

    JEL classification:

    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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