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Credibility, Transparency and Asymmetric Information in Monetary Policy

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  • Hughes Hallett, Andrew
  • Viegi, Nicola

Abstract

The literature has often commented on, but seldom explicitly analysed, the effects of a lack of transparency in monetary policy. Using a standard theoretical model where there are also opportunities for fiscal intervention, we argue that the effects of a lack of transparency will be very different depending on whether they reflect preference or goal uncertainties: that is, whether they represent a lack of political transparency or a lack of economic transparency. The former allows the Central Bank to create and exploit a 'strategic' reputation to its own advantage; the latter does not. The test that distinguishes the two cases is whether inflation forecasts are published or not. We also find that transparency is a partial, but strictly limited substitute for accountability.

Suggested Citation

  • Hughes Hallett, Andrew & Viegi, Nicola, 2001. "Credibility, Transparency and Asymmetric Information in Monetary Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 2671, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2671
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Giovanni Di Bartolomeo & Enrico Marchetti, 2004. "Central banks and information provided to the private sector," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 57(230), pages 265-295.
    2. Kaufmann, Daniel & Bellver, Ana, 2005. "Transparenting Transparency: Intial Empirics and Policy Applications," MPRA Paper 8188, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Accountability; Policy Transparency; Political Uncertainty; Reputation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission

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