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Objectivity, Proximity and Adaptability in Corporate Governance

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  • Boot, Arnoud W A
  • Macey, Jonathon

Abstract

Countries appear to differ considerably in the basic orientations of their corporate governance structures. We postulate the trade-off between objectivity and proximity as fundamental to the corporate governance debate. We stress the value of objectivity that comes with distance (e.g. the market oriented U.S. system), and the value of better information that comes with proximity (e.g. the more intrusive Continental European model). A superior corporate governance arrangement must balance the benefits of proximity and objectivity. In this context, we also discuss the ways in which investors have "contracted around" the flaws in their own corporate governance systems, pointing at the adaptability of different arrangements.

Suggested Citation

  • Boot, Arnoud W A & Macey, Jonathon, 1999. "Objectivity, Proximity and Adaptability in Corporate Governance," CEPR Discussion Papers 2257, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2257
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Burkart, Mike & Panunzi, Fausto, 2006. "Agency conflicts, ownership concentration, and legal shareholder protection," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 1-31, January.
    2. Dherment-Ferere, Isabelle & Köke, Jens & Renneboog, Luc, 2001. "Corporate monitoring by blockholders in Europe: empirical evidence of managerial disciplining in Belgium, France, Germany, and the UK," ZEW Discussion Papers 01-24, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Alberto Zazzaro, 2001. "Specificità e modelli di governo delle banche: un' analisi degli assetti proprietari dei gruppi bancari italiani," Moneta e Credito, Economia civile, vol. 54(216), pages 487-517.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Comparative Financial Systems; Corporate Governance;

    JEL classification:

    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance
    • K2 - Law and Economics - - Regulation and Business Law
    • P5 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems

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