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The Great Recession was not so Great

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  • van Ours, Jan C.

Abstract

The Great Recession is characterized by a GDP-decline that was unprecedented in the past decades. This paper discusses the implications of the Great Recession analyzing labor market data from 20 OECD countries. Comparing the Great Recession with the 1980s recession it is concluded that there is a high cross-country correlation of the unemployment rates over the two recessions indicating that some labor markets are more vulnerable to fluctuations in economic growth than others. Young workers are the most affected by the Great Recession both in terms of unemployment rates as well as employment rates. For prime age workers employment rates were also affected but for older workers the Great Recession did not have a large impact. To analyze how economic growth and labor market institutions have affected unemployment two types of models are estimated. The main conclusion is rather straightforward and has a "one size fits all" character: to reduce unemployment and create jobs economic growth is needed.

Suggested Citation

  • van Ours, Jan C., 2015. "The Great Recession was not so Great," CEPR Discussion Papers 10376, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10376
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bruno Crépon & Esther Duflo & Marc Gurgand & Roland Rathelot & Philippe Zamora, 2013. "Do Labor Market Policies have Displacement Effects? Evidence from a Clustered Randomized Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(2), pages 531-580.
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    4. Belot, Michele & van Ours, Jan C., 2001. "Unemployment and Labor Market Institutions: An Empirical Analysis," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 403-418, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bas Weel, 2015. "Unemployment: The Great Recession and Beyond," De Economist, Springer, vol. 163(4), pages 405-413, December.
    2. Doris, Aedin & O'Neill, Donal & Sweetman, Olive, 2017. "Does Reducing Unemployment Benefits During a Recession Reduce Youth Unemployment? Evidence from a 50% Cut in Unemployment Assistance," IZA Discussion Papers 10727, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. repec:rfe:zbefri:v:35:y:2017:i:1:p:13-44 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Priscila Ferreira & George Saridakis, 2016. "Firm Shutdown During the Financial and Sovereign Debt Crises: Empirical Evidence from Portugal," NIMA Working Papers 61, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
    5. Dixon, Robert & Lim, Guay C. & van Ours, Jan C., 2016. "Revisiting Okun's Relationship," CEPR Discussion Papers 11184, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. repec:spr:italej:v:3:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s40797-016-0045-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Elvira Ciociano & Sergio Destefanis, 2017. "The role of the education systems and the labour market institutions in enhancing youth employment: a cross-country analysis," Discussion Papers 1_2017, CRISEI, University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employment; Great Recession; Unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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