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Some determinants of reporting workplace accidents in France: The role of labour contract

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  • Askenazy, Philippe

Abstract

This article uses a unique French survey that makes it possible to explore various individual determinants of workplace accident reporting. This survey covers a representative sample of 13,000 private- sector employees. Some 10% of workers suffer at least one workplace injury each year and that only 80% report it to the social security. A multivariate analysis with sample selection shows that severity and types of injury are clear determinants of reporting. Low-educated, but with a first degree, workers and workers in large firms seem to more likely report their injuries, and managers less. In addition, workers recently hired or on probation for a permanent job and previously unemployed or on a precarious position are significantly less likely to file a claim. This result suggests that labour market conditions can influence reporting.

Suggested Citation

  • Askenazy, Philippe, 2006. "Some determinants of reporting workplace accidents in France: The role of labour contract," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 0603, CEPREMAP.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpm:docweb:0603
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    File URL: http://www.cepremap.fr/depot/docweb/docweb0603.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jeff Biddle & Karen Roberts, 2003. "Claiming Behavior in Workers' Compensation," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 70(4), pages 759-780, December.
    2. Boone, J. & van Ours, J.C., 2002. "Cyclical Fluctuations in Workplace Accidents," Discussion Paper 2002-98, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    3. Philippe Askenazy & Ève Caroli & Vincent Marcus, 2002. "New Organizational Practices and Working Conditions . Evidence from France in the 1990's," Recherches économiques de Louvain, De Boeck Université, vol. 68(1), pages 91-110.
    4. Thomas J. Kniesner & John D. Leeth, 1989. "Separating the Reporting Effects from the Injury Rate Effects of Workers' Compensation Insurance: A Hedonic Simulation," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 42(2), pages 280-293, January.
    5. Dionne, Georges & St-Michel, Pierre, 1991. "Workers' Compensation and Moral Hazard," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(2), pages 236-244, May.
    6. Rea, Samuel A, Jr, 1981. "Workmen's Compensation and Occupational Safety under Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(1), pages 80-93, March.
    7. Bruce, Christopher J & Atkins, Frank J, 1993. "Efficiency Effects of Premium-Setting Regimes under Workers' Compensation: Canada and the United States," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 38-69, January.
    8. Butler, Richard J & Durbin, David L & Helvacian, Nurhan M, 1996. "Increasing Claims for Soft Tissue Injuries in Workers' Compensation: Cost Shifting and Moral Hazard," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 73-87, July.
    9. repec:dau:papers:123456789/10101 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Konstantinos, Pouliakas & Ioannis, Theodossiou, 2010. "An Inquiry Into the Theory, Causes and Consequences of Monitoring Indicators of Health and Safety At Work," MPRA Paper 20336, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Mohamed Ali Ben Halima & Camille Regaert, 2015. "Quel est l’impact de la survenue d’un accident du travail sur la santé et le parcours professionnel ?," Working Papers DT68, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Jul 2015.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    France; occupational injury; reporting.;

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions

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