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The simple analytics of optimal growth with illegal migrants

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  • Hazari, Bharat R.
  • Sgro, Pasquale M.

Abstract

This paper analyses the impact of illegal migration on the optimal path of domestic (resident) consumption. The analysis draws two importants conclusions. First, if illegal migrants and domestic labour are perfect substitutes, illegal migration necessarily lowers the long-run per capital consumption of domestic residents. Second, if illegal migrants and domestic labour are imperfect substitutes, the effect on the long-run per capital domestic consumption is ambiguous, however, in the Cobb-douglas case, the result is clear cut an per capita domestic consumption rises as a result of illegal migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Hazari, Bharat R. & Sgro, Pasquale M., 2003. "The simple analytics of optimal growth with illegal migrants," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Couverture Orange) 0301, CEPREMAP.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpm:cepmap:0301
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bharat R. Hazari & Pasquale M. Sgro, 2000. "Illegal Migration, Border Enforcement, and Growth," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 258-267, October.
    2. Hillman, Arye L. & Weiss, Avi, 1999. "A theory of permissible illegal immigration," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 585-604, November.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

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