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Two Centuries of Bilateral Trade and Gravity data: 1827-2014

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  • Michel Fouquin

    ()

  • Jules Hugot

    ()

Abstract

This document provides a detailed description of the Historical Bilateral Trade and Gravity Data set (TRADHIST) that was put together for Fouquin and Hugot (2016) and designed for historical investigations of international trade. The data set is available on the website of CEPII. Speci?cally, the data set has been built to explore the two modern waves of globalization: the First Globalization of the nineteenth century and the post-World War II Second Globalization. The data set gathers ?ve types of variables: i) bilateral nominal trade ?ows, ii) country-level aggregate nominal exports and imports, iii) nominal GDPs, iv) exchange rates, and v) bilateral factors that are known to favor or hamper trade, including geographical distance, common borders, colonial and linguistic links, as well as bilateral tari?s. This data is unique both in terms of temporal and geographical coverage. Overall, we gather more than 1.9 million bilateral trade observations for the 188 years from 1827 to 2014. We also provide about 42,000 observations on aggregate trade, and about 14,000 observations on GDPs and exchange rates respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Michel Fouquin & Jules Hugot, 2016. "Two Centuries of Bilateral Trade and Gravity data: 1827-2014," Vniversitas Económica 015129, Universidad Javeriana - Bogotá.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000416:015129
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    File URL: http://cea.javeriana.edu.co/investigacion-publicaciones/documentos-trabajo/vniversitas-economica
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bonino-Gayoso, Nicolás & Tena-Junguito, Antonio & Willebald, Henry, 2015. "Uruguay And The First Globalization: On The Accuracy Of Export Performance, 1870-1913," Revista de Historia Económica / Journal of Iberian and Latin American Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 33(2), pages 287-320, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Globalization; Trade costs; Border e?ect; Distance e?ect;

    JEL classification:

    • C8 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs
    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • N70 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - General, International, or Comparative

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