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El crecimiento económico internacional en la segunda mitad del siglo XX ¿que factores lo determinaron?


  • Carlos E. Posada


  • Eliana Carolina Rubiano



En este ensayo presentamos un modelo de crecimiento económico y los resultados de su estimacióneconométrica. Entre sus variables incluimos las demográficas y de capital físico y humano. El ejercicioempírico se basó en un panel dinámico" que cubrió un período de aproximadamente cuatro decenios(1960-2000) y tres muestras de países con el fin de apreciar la robustez de los resultados. La primera, con59 países, y, las otras dos, diferenciando entre países pobres y ricos. Los resultados de la muestra totalparecen dominados por los de la sub-muestra de países pobres, a saber: solo la tasa de inversión encapital físico fue significativa en la determinación de la tasa de crecimiento económico. En el caso de lospaíses ricos, además de la inversión en capital físico, también se mostraron significativas la inversión encapital humano (con un efecto rezagado de 10 años) y la constante, sugiriendo, esto último, que fueimportante en estos países un cambio técnico exógeno como uno de sus motores de crecimiento."

Suggested Citation

  • Carlos E. Posada & Eliana Carolina Rubiano, 2007. "El crecimiento económico internacional en la segunda mitad del siglo XX ¿que factores lo determinaron?," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 003956, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000094:003956

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item


    crecimiento económico; acumulaciones de capital físico y humano; fertilidad; mortalidad infantil; panel dinámico.;

    JEL classification:

    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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