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A comparative study of well-being for elders in Mexico and England

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Abstract

This paper establishes econometrically a clear connection between levels of happiness, health and cognition with their respective levels of income, using Mexican (MHAS) and English (ELSA) data. In general, elderly people increase their happiness with income, education, with a partner and when healthier, but decrease with unemployment and divorce. Mexican cognition ability and being indigenous impact negatively in happiness, but being white and more cognitive is better for the English. Physical health is better in both countries considering income, education, employment and mental health. A strong result is that depression and restlessness affect negatively physical health in general. English people seem to deteriorate health because of debts, but not the Mexicans. Elder Mexicans are severely punished in their health when living in consensual unions, but the English are the healthiest living under this family organization. Mental health, approximated with cognition ability, was the relationship with less significance. Divorcees in Mexico have more cognitive ability. Considering gender, we found happier men, but older and more cognitive women in general.

Suggested Citation

  • David Vázquez Guzman, 2012. "A comparative study of well-being for elders in Mexico and England," Estudios Regionales en Economía, Población y Desarrollo. Cuadernos de Trabajo de la Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez. 9, Cuerpo Académico 41 de la Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, revised 09 Dec 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:cjz:ca41cj:9
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    1. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Günther Fink, 2010. "Implications of population ageing for economic growth," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(4), pages 583-612, Winter.
    2. Banks, James & Muriel, Alastair & Smith, James P., 2010. "Attrition and Health in Ageing Studies: Evidence from ELSA and HRS," IZA Discussion Papers 5161, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    6. Alejandro Cid & Daniel Ferrés & Máximo Rossi, 2008. "Testing Happiness Hypothesis among the Elderly," REVISTA CUADERNOS DE ECONOMÍA, UN - RCE - CID.
    7. Philippa Clarke & Jacqui Smith, 2011. "Aging in a Cultural Context: Cross-national Differences in Disability and the Moderating Role of Personal Control Among Older Adults in the United States and England," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 66(4), pages 457-467.
    8. A. Colin Cameron & Pravin K. Trivedi, 2010. "Microeconometrics Using Stata, Revised Edition," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, number musr.
    9. John Strauss & Paul J. Gertler & Omar Rahman & Kristin Fox, 1993. "Gender and Life-Cycle Differentials in the Patterns and Determinants of Adult Health," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(4), pages 791-837.
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    11. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2008.139469_1 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Alejandro Cid & Daniel Ferrés & Máximo Rossi, 2008. "Testing Happiness Hypothesis among the Elderly," REVISTA CUADERNOS DE ECONOMÍA, UN - RCE - CID.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Well-being; elderly people; comparative studies; England; Mexico;

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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