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The Distorted Effect of Financial Development on International Trade Flows

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  • Antoine Berthou

Abstract

This paper investigates the effects of financial development on the intensive and extensive margins of countries exports, at different stages of economic development. The paper develops a partial equilibrium model with monopolistic competition. In this model, firms are heterogeneous in terms of productivity and have access to external liquidity. The effect of financial development on the intensive and extensive margins of countries exports is predicted to be positive, especially in sectors with a higher demand for external finance. In countries with poor financial institutions though, only the most productive firms benefit from an increased access to financial resources and start exporting, with little effect on aggregate exports. The effect of financial development on exports is therefore higher for a better initial development of financial institutions. The empirical analysis confirms that financial development promotes both the intensive and extensive margins of countries’ exports. This is more the case in industries with a higher demand for external finance. Though, more than 60% of the effect of financial development channels through the intensive margin. In industries where the demand for external finance is high, the effect of financial development is the highest in economies characterized by an intermediate development of financial institutions, and the lowest in countries with poor or advanced financial institutions. This contradicts the traditional expectation that financial development benefits more in terms of exports to countries where financial constraints are the most binding.

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  • Antoine Berthou, 2010. "The Distorted Effect of Financial Development on International Trade Flows," Working Papers 2010-09, CEPII research center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cii:cepidt:2010-09
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    1. Thierry Mayer & Keith Head, 2002. "Illusory Border Effects: Distance Mismeasurement Inflates Estimates of Home Bias in Trade," Working Papers 2002-01, CEPII research center.
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    1. repec:dau:papers:123456789/7596 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Schmidt-Eisenlohr, Tim, 2013. "Towards a theory of trade finance," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 96-112.
    3. Berman, Nicolas & Héricourt, Jérôme, 2010. "Financial factors and the margins of trade: Evidence from cross-country firm-level data," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 206-217, November.
    4. A. Berthou & G. Horny & J-S. Mésonnier, 2018. "Dollar Funding and Firm-Level Exports," Working papers 666, Banque de France.
    5. ByeongHwa Choi & Volodymyr Lugovskyy, 2015. "Positive and Negative Effects of Financial Development on Export Prices," CAEPR Working Papers 2015-020, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Department of Economics, Indiana University Bloomington.
    6. Rafael Cezar, 2011. "Newtoning financial development with heterogeneous firms," Working Papers DT/2011/12, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    7. Muhammad Asif Shamim; Syed Tehseen Jawaid; Farooq-E-Azam Cheema, 2019. "How does financial development impact trade openness? Evidence from export performance of Pakistan," South Asian Journal of Management Sciences (SAJMS), Iqra University, Iqra University, vol. 13(1), pages 74-98, Spring.
    8. Joachim Jarreau & Sandra Poncet, 2014. "Credit constraints, firm ownership and the structure of exports in China," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 139, pages 152-173.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bilateral Trade; Trade margins; Financial Development;

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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