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Trust and Trustworthiness under Information Asymmetry and Ambiguity

Author

Listed:
  • Irma Clots-Figueras

    (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

  • Roberto Hernán González

    (University of Nottingham and Economic Science Institute, Chapman University)

  • Praveen Kujal

    (Middlesex University and Economic Science Institute, Chapman University)

Abstract

We introduce uncertainty and ambiguity in the standard investment game. In the uncertainty treatment, investors are informed that the return of the investment is drawn from a publicly known distribution function. In the ambiguity treatment, investors are not informed about the distribution function. We find that both trust and trustworthiness are robust to the introduction of these changes.

Suggested Citation

  • Irma Clots-Figueras & Roberto Hernán González & Praveen Kujal, 2016. "Trust and Trustworthiness under Information Asymmetry and Ambiguity," Working Papers 16-17, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:chu:wpaper:16-17
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cox, James C., 2004. "How to identify trust and reciprocity," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 260-281, February.
    2. Johnson, Noel D. & Mislin, Alexandra A., 2011. "Trust games: A meta-analysis," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 865-889.
    3. Berg Joyce & Dickhaut John & McCabe Kevin, 1995. "Trust, Reciprocity, and Social History," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 122-142, July.
    4. Daniel Ellsberg, 1961. "Risk, Ambiguity, and the Savage Axioms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(4), pages 643-669.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ho Fai Chan & Martin Brumpton & Alison Macintyre & Jefferson Arapoc & David A. Savage & Ahmed Skali & David Stadelmann & Benno Torgler, 2020. "How confidence in health care systems affects mobility and compliance during the COVID-19 pandemic," CREMA Working Paper Series 2020-11, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    2. Chen Li & Uyanga Turmunkh & Peter P. Wakker, 2019. "Trust as a decision under ambiguity," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 22(1), pages 51-75, March.
    3. van den Akker, Olmo R. & van Assen, Marcel A.L.M. & van Vugt, Mark & Wicherts, Jelte M., 2020. "Sex differences in trust and trustworthiness: A meta-analysis of the trust game and the gift-exchange game," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 81(C).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics
    • C9 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty

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