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Employment Resilience through Services Exports? Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data

Listed author(s):
  • Pedro S. Martins

Can increased exports of services make a significant contribution to employment resilience during recessions? We study the case of Portugal between 2007 and 2013, a period that includes both a major downturn and a number of structural reforms. Our methodology is based on matched employer-employee panel data and a simple difference-in-differences approach, contrasting service sectors, including those with greater export potential, with other sectors. We find that the employment levels of service sectors exhibit relative increases of approximately 10% in 2012-13. We also find that foreign direct investment explains an important part of this positive employment effect. Overall, our results support the view that services exports can accelerate macroeconomic adjustment, particularly when countries are able to attract foreign capital.

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Paper provided by Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research in its series Working Papers with number 79.

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Date of creation: Nov 2016
Handle: RePEc:cgs:wpaper:79
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  1. Pedro Martins & Luca David Opromolla, 2011. "Why Ex(Im)porters Pay More: Evidence from Matched Firm-Worker Panels," Working Papers w201123, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  2. Martins, Pedro S., 2016. "The Third Worker: Assessing the Trade-off between Employees and Contractors," IZA Discussion Papers 10222, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Alexander Hijzen & Pedro S. Martins, 2016. "No Extension without Representation? Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Collective Bargaining," Working Papers 68, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
  4. Pedro S. Martins, 2016. "Can overtime premium flexibility promote employment? Firm- and worker-level evidence from a labour law reform," Working Papers 72, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
  5. Pedro S. Martins, 2009. "Dismissals for Cause: The Difference That Just Eight Paragraphs Can Make," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(2), pages 257-279, 04.
  6. Alexander Hijzen & Mauro Pisu & Richard Upward & Peter W. Wright, 2011. "Employment, job turnover, and trade in producer services: UK firm-level evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 44(3), pages 1020-1043, August.
  7. Pedro Martins & Yong Yang, 2009. "The impact of exporting on firm productivity: a meta-analysis of the learning-by-exporting hypothesis," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 145(3), pages 431-445, October.
  8. Pedro S. Martins & Sofia Pessoa e Costa, 2014. "Reemployment and Substitution Effects from Increased Activation: Evidence from Times of Crisis," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp590, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
  9. Martins, Pedro S., 2016. "Should the Maximum Duration of Fixed-Term Contracts Increase in Recessions? Evidence from a Law Reform," IZA Discussion Papers 10206, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Hijzen, Alexander & Martins, Pedro S. & Schank, Thorsten & Upward, Richard, 2013. "Foreign-owned firms around the world: A comparative analysis of wages and employment at the micro-level," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 170-188.
  11. Pedro S. Martins & Yong Yang, 2015. "Globalized Labour Markets? International Rent Sharing Across 47 Countries," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 53(4), pages 664-691, December.
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