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Trust In Fairtrade: The 'Feel-Good' Effect

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  • Brigitte Granville

Abstract

Fairtrade is nurtured with stories aimed at making consumers feel good by buying Fairtrade products. This ‘feel-good’ factor may vary when it is found that, the proportional division of the benefits between producer and other potential gainers is biased towards the distributors. There is, therefore, an incentive to verify whether the trust accorded to Fairtrade is justified. If trust and therefore the feel-good factor are undermined or enhanced as a result of the validation of the stories, then the whole Fairtrade movement could potentially crumble or burgeon. Drawing on elements in Glaeser (2005)’s model, this paper analyses the factors behind the recent expansion of Fairtrade.

Suggested Citation

  • Brigitte Granville, 2009. "Trust In Fairtrade: The 'Feel-Good' Effect," Working Papers 27, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:cgs:wpaper:27
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    File URL: http://webspace.qmul.ac.uk/pmartins/CGRWP27.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Nindl, Elisabeth, 2014. "An empirical assessment of Fairtrade: A perspective for low-and middle-income countries?," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 4069, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    2. Elisabeth Nindl, 2014. "An empirical assessment of Fairtrade: A perspective for low- and middle-income countries?," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp160, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    3. Elisabeth Nindl, 2014. "An empirical assessment of Fairtrade: A perspective for low- and middle-income countries?," EcoMod2014 6866, EcoMod.

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    Keywords

    Fairtrade;

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