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Five Facts about the Distributional Income Effects of Monetary Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Niklas Amberg
  • Thomas Jansson
  • Mathias Klein
  • Anna Rogantini Picco

Abstract

We use Swedish administrative individual-level data to document five facts about the distributional income effects of monetary policy. (i) The effects of monetary policy shocks are U-shaped with respect to the income distribution—i.e., expansionary shocks increase the incomes of high- and low-income individuals relative to middle-income individuals. (ii) The large effects in the bottom are accounted for by the labor-income response and (iii) those in the top by the capital-income response. (iv) The heterogeneity in the labor-income response is due to the earnings heterogeneity channel, whereas (v) that in the capital-income response is due to the income composition channel.

Suggested Citation

  • Niklas Amberg & Thomas Jansson & Mathias Klein & Anna Rogantini Picco, 2021. "Five Facts about the Distributional Income Effects of Monetary Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 9062, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_9062
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    monetary policy; income inequality; heterogeneous agents; administrative data;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C55 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Large Data Sets: Modeling and Analysis
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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