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The Exchange Rate and its Fundamentals. A Chaotic Perspective

  • Paul De Grauwe
  • Marianna Grimaldi
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    We analyse the workings of a simple non-linear exchange rate model in which agents hold different beliefs about the underlying model. We distinguish between ‘chartists’ and ‘fundamentalists’. The non-linearities in the model originate from transactions costs and from the existence of non-linear adjustment dynamics in the goods market. We find, first, that the simple non-linear structure of the model is capable of generating a very complex exchange rate dynamics. Second, our model is capable of explaining some empirical puzzles concerning exchange rate behaviour, i.e. the ‘disconnect’ puzzle which says that the exchange rate is disconnected form its underlying fundamentals most of the time and the excess volatility puzzle.

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    Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 639.

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    Date of creation: 2002
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_639
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    1. Maurice Obstfeld and Kenneth Rogoff., 2000. "The Six Major Puzzles in International Macroeconomics: Is There a Common Cause?," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers C00-112, University of California at Berkeley.
    2. Mark P. Taylor, 2003. "Purchasing Power Parity," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(3), pages 436-452, 08.
    3. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Lai, Kon S., 2000. "On the purchasing power parity puzzle," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 321-330, December.
    4. Mordecai Kurz & Maurizio Motolese, 1999. "Endogenous Uncertainty and Market Volatility," Working Papers 1999.27, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    5. Isard,Peter, 1995. "Exchange Rate Economics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521460477.
    6. Peel, David & Sarno, Lucio & Taylor, Mark P, 2001. "Nonlinear Mean-Reversion in Real Exchange Rates: Towards a Solution to the Purchasing Power Parity Puzzles," CEPR Discussion Papers 2658, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Paul Hallwood & Ronald MacDonald, 2008. "International Money and Finance," Working papers 2008-02, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    8. Kenneth Rogoff, 1996. "The Purchasing Power Parity Puzzle," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(2), pages 647-668, June.
    9. Isard,Peter, 1995. "Exchange Rate Economics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521466004.
    10. Marianne Baxter & Alan C. Stockman, 1988. "Business Cycles and the Exchange Rate System: Some International Evidence," NBER Working Papers 2689, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Taylor, Mark P. & Allen, Helen, 1992. "The use of technical analysis in the foreign exchange market," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 304-314, June.
    12. Meese, Richard A. & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1983. "Empirical exchange rate models of the seventies : Do they fit out of sample?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1-2), pages 3-24, February.
    13. Li, Kai, 1999. "Testing Symmetry and Proportionality in PPP: A Panel-Data Approach," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 17(4), pages 409-18, October.
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