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Why Do Investors Hold Socially Responsible Mutual Funds?

Author

Listed:
  • Arno Riedl
  • Paul Smeets

Abstract

To understand why investors hold socially responsible mutual funds, we link administrative data to survey responses and behavior in incentivized experiments. We find that both social preferences and social signaling explain socially responsible investment (SRI) decisions. Financial motives play less of a role. Socially responsible investors in our sample expect to earn lower returns on SRI funds than on conventional funds and pay higher management fees. This suggests that investors are willing to forgo financial performance in order to invest in accordance with their social preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • Arno Riedl & Paul Smeets, 2013. "Why Do Investors Hold Socially Responsible Mutual Funds?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4403, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_4403
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    File URL: https://www.cesifo.org/DocDL/cesifo1_wp4403.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    experimental finance; social preferences; socially responsible investments; mutual funds;

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General

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