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Are Non-Eligible Students Affected by Special Education?


  • Jon Marius Vaag Iversen
  • Hans Bonesrønning
  • Ivar Pettersen


We investigate whether the academic performance of non-eligible students – in an institutional setting of full inclusion - are affected by special education resources. Special education resources are per definition provided in a compensatory manner, and are increasingly being targeted to misbehaving students. The hypothesis is thus that special education resources might dampen the negative externalities associated with misbehaving students, and thus work to improve the performance of non-eligible students. We take advantage of a large, across-the-board increase in the proportion of eligible students, and combine fixed effects with an IV-approach, to identify the causal effects of special education on the academic performance of non-eligible students. We find that non-eligible students are positively affected by an increase in the number of hours in special education per eligible student.

Suggested Citation

  • Jon Marius Vaag Iversen & Hans Bonesrønning & Ivar Pettersen, 2013. "Are Non-Eligible Students Affected by Special Education?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4156, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_4156

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Scott E. Carrell & Mark L. Hoekstra, 2010. "Externalities in the Classroom: How Children Exposed to Domestic Violence Affect Everyone's Kids," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 211-228, January.
    2. Raj Chetty & John N. Friedman & Jonah E. Rockoff, 2011. "The Long-Term Impacts of Teachers: Teacher Value-Added and Student Outcomes in Adulthood," NBER Working Papers 17699, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. John F. Ermisch & Marco Francesconi, 2001. "Family structure and children's achievements," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(2), pages 249-270.
    4. Bonesronning, Hans, 2008. "Peer group effects in education production: Is it about congestion," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 328-342, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Deuchert, Eva & Kauer, Lukas & Liebert, Helge & Wuppermann, Carl, 2013. "No disabled student left behind? - Evidence from a social field experiment," Economics Working Paper Series 1336, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.

    More about this item


    student achievement; special education; externalities;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education


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