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The Effect of Surveillance Cameras on Crime: Evidence from the Stockholm Subway

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  • Mikael Priks

Abstract

This paper studies the effect of surveillance cameras on crime in the Stockholm subway. Beginning in 2006, surveillance cameras were installed in the subway stations at different points in time. Difference-in-difference analysis reveals that the introduction of the cameras reduced crime by approximately 20 percent in busy stations. I also show that some of the crimes were displaced to the surrounding area.

Suggested Citation

  • Mikael Priks, 2009. "The Effect of Surveillance Cameras on Crime: Evidence from the Stockholm Subway," CESifo Working Paper Series 2905, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_2905
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp2905.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Klick, Jonathan & Tabarrok, Alexander, 2005. "Using Terror Alert Levels to Estimate the Effect of Police on Crime," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(1), pages 267-279, April.
    2. Poutvaara, Panu & Priks, Mikael, 2009. "The effect of police intelligence on group violence: Evidence from reassignments in Sweden," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 403-411.
    3. Justin McCrary, 2002. "Using Electoral Cycles in Police Hiring to Estimate the Effect of Police on Crime: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1236-1243, September.
    4. Rafael Di Tella & Ernesto Schargrodsky, 2004. "Do Police Reduce Crime? Estimates Using the Allocation of Police Forces After a Terrorist Attack," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 115-133, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Baumann, Florian & Friehe, Tim, 2013. "Private protection against crime when property value is private information," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 73-79.
    2. Oana Borcan & Mikael Lindahl & Andreea Mitrut, 2017. "Fighting Corruption in Education: What Works and Who Benefits?," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 180-209, February.
    3. Zimmerman, Paul R., 2010. "Deterrence from self-protection measures in the ‘market model’ of crime: dynamic panel data estimates from employment in private security occupations," MPRA Paper 26187, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Weber, Bryan, 2014. "Can safe ride programs reduce urban crime?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 1-11.
    5. Tim Friehe & Thomas J. Miceli, 2016. "Law Enforcement in a Federal System: On the Strategic Choice of Sanction Levels," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(1), pages 73-103.
    6. Zimmerman, Paul R., 2014. "The deterrence of crime through private security efforts: Theory and evidence," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 66-75.
    7. Ignacio Munyo & Martín Rossi, 2016. "Is it Displacement? Evidence on the Impact of Police Monitoring on Crime," Working Papers 126, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Aug 2016.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    surveillance cameras; crime; natural experiments;

    JEL classification:

    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • K40 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - General

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