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A Decent Home: Housing Policy in Perspective


  • Quigley, John M.


This paper provides a selective review of two aspects of urban policy in the U.S. -- federal policy providing housing subsidies for lower income households, and federal support for urban redevelopment and physical renewal. The paper reviews four periods in the history of American housing policy, indicating the major equity and efficiency issues in delivering housing services, the factors affecting program costs, and the development of more effective programs. The paper also traces urban development policy from the urban renewal partnership sponsored by the 1949 Housing Act to the present, indicating the linkage between theories of intergovernmental fiscal relations and the evolution of programs. The analysis is mostly an exercise in positive economics, explicating the development of policies, their economic rationale, and economic consequences. However, inevitably, there is some attention paid to the normative aspects of these programs.

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  • Quigley, John M., 2002. "A Decent Home: Housing Policy in Perspective," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt8f57x42q, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:bphupl:qt8f57x42q

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. O'Regan, Katherine M. & Quigley, John M., 1997. "Accessibility and Economic Opportunity," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt37h6t700, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Richard A. Musgrave, 1961. "Approaches to a Fiscal Theory of Political Federalism," NBER Chapters,in: Public Finances: Needs, Sources, and Utilization, pages 97-134 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Susin, Scott, 1999. "Rent Vouchers and the Price of Low-Income Housing," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt67d5x29s, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
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    Cited by:

    1. Quigley, John M., 2008. "Housing Policy in the United States," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt89p9r7w9, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
    2. Jens Otto Ludwig & Greg Duncan & Joshua C. Pinkston, 2000. "Neighborhood Effects on Economic Self-Sufficiency: Evidence from a Randomized Housing-Mobility Experiment," JCPR Working Papers 159, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    3. Jacob Vigdor & Jens Ludwig, 2007. "Segregation and the Black-White Test Score Gap," NBER Working Papers 12988, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Nathaniel Baum-Snow & Justin Marion, 2007. "The Effects of Low Income Housing Developments on Neighborhoods," Working Papers 2007-5, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    5. Warnock, Veronica Cacdac & Warnock, Francis E., 2008. "Markets and housing finance," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 239-251, September.
    6. O'Regan, Katherine M. & Quigley, John M., 2000. "Federal Policy and the Rise of Nonprofit Housing Providers," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt7ps134cg, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
    7. Eriksen, Michael D., 2009. "The market price of Low-Income Housing Tax Credits," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 141-149, September.
    8. Rebecca M. Blank & David T. Ellwood, 2001. "The Clinton Legacy for America's Poor," NBER Working Papers 8437, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Todd Sinai & Joel Waldfogel, "undated". "Do Low Income Housing Subsidies Increase Housing Consumption?," Zell/Lurie Center Working Papers 394, Wharton School Samuel Zell and Robert Lurie Real Estate Center, University of Pennsylvania.
    10. Jeffrey R. Kling & Jeffrey Liebman & Lawrence F. Katz & Lisa Sanbonmatsu, 2004. "Moving to Opportunity and Tranquility: Neighborhood Effects on Adult Economic Self-Sufficiency and Health From a Randomized Housing Voucher Experiment," Working Papers 5, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    11. Jaffee, Dwight M. & Quigley, John M., 2007. "Housing Subsidies and Homeowners: What Role for Government-Sponsored Enterprises?," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt6g8986r5, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
    12. Rhiannon Patterson, 2008. "Neighborhood Effects on High-School Drop-Out Rates and Teenage Childbearing: Tests for Non-Linearities, Race-Specific Effects, Interactions with Family Characteristics, and Endogenous Causation using ," Working Papers 08-12, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    13. John M. Quigley & Steven Raphael, 2004. "Is Housing Unaffordable? Why Isn't It More Affordable?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(1), pages 191-214, Winter.
    14. Lui, Hon-Kwong & Suen, Wing, 2011. "The effects of public housing on internal mobility in Hong Kong," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 15-29, March.
    15. Quigley, John M. & Raphael, Steven & Smolensky, Eugene, 2001. "Homelessness in California," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt2pg3f4ns, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
    16. Sinai, Todd & Waldfogel, Joel, 2005. "Do low-income housing subsidies increase the occupied housing stock?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(11-12), pages 2137-2164, December.

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