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The Impact of Housing Subsidies on the Rental Sector: the French Example

Author

Listed:
  • C. GRISLAIN-LETRÉMY

    (Insee)

  • C. TREVIEN

    (Sciences Po et Crest-Insee)

Abstract

Housing subsidies to tenants are a main tool for housing policy in France. They aim to limit the budget share of housing for eligible tenants or to improve their housing conditions for a given budget share. Despite the increasing budget allocated to housing subsidies since the end of the 1970s, the budget share of housing for low-income tenants has kept increasing, in particular in the private rental sector. We assess the impact of housing subsidies on price, quality and quantity in the private rental sector. To do so, we use an instrumental variable method based on a spatial discontinuity in the subsidy scheme. We show that housing subsidies had an inflationist impact in the 1990s and the 2000s. Besides, higher subsidies seem to have almost no effect on housing quality and to have no impact on the number of offered rental dwellings.

Suggested Citation

  • C. Grislain-Letrémy & C. Trevien, 2014. "The Impact of Housing Subsidies on the Rental Sector: the French Example," Documents de Travail de l'Insee - INSEE Working Papers g2014-08, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques.
  • Handle: RePEc:nse:doctra:g2014-08
    as

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    File URL: https://www.insee.fr/fr/statistiques/fichier/1381152/G2014-08.pdf
    File Function: Document de travail de la DESE numéro G2014-08
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Edward L. Glaeser & Joseph Gyourko & Raven E. Saks, 2005. "Why Have Housing Prices Gone Up?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 329-333, May.
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    3. Eriksen, Michael D. & Rosenthal, Stuart S., 2010. "Crowd out effects of place-based subsidized rental housing: New evidence from the LIHTC program," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(11-12), pages 953-966, December.
    4. Gibbons, Stephen & Manning, Alan, 2006. "The incidence of UK housing benefit: Evidence from the 1990s reforms," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(4-5), pages 799-822, May.
    5. Aki Kangasharju, 2010. "Housing Allowance and the Rent of Low‐income Households," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 112(3), pages 595-617, September.
    6. Anne Laferrère & David le Blanc, 2002. "Comment les aides au logement affectent-elles les loyers ?," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 351(1), pages 3-30.
    7. Sinai, Todd & Waldfogel, Joel, 2005. "Do low-income housing subsidies increase the occupied housing stock?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(11-12), pages 2137-2164, December.
    8. Susin, Scott, 2002. "Rent vouchers and the price of low-income housing," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 109-152, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sayag, Doron & Zussman, Noam, 2020. "Who benefits from rental assistance? Evidence from a natural experiment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(C).
    2. Brewer, Mike & Browne, James & Emmerson, Carl & Hood, Andrew & Joyce, Robert, 2019. "The curious incidence of rent subsidies: Evidence of heterogeneity from administrative data," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    housing subsidies; tax incidence;

    JEL classification:

    • H22 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Incidence
    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets

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