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Lessons of the Euro for the Rest of the World

  • Eichengreen, Barry

Europe’s single currency is widely invoked as a potential solution to the monetary and exchange rate problems of other regions, including Asia, Latin America, North America and even Africa. This lecture asks whether the Europe’s experience in creating the euro is exportable. It argues that the single currency is the result of a larger integrationist project that has political as well as economic dimensions. The appetite for political integration being less in other parts of the world, the euro will not be easily emulated. Other regions will have to find different means of addressing the tension between domestic monetary autonomy and regional integration. Harmonized inflation targeting may be the best available solution.

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Paper provided by Institute of European Studies, UC Berkeley in its series Institute of European Studies, Working Paper Series with number qt16g425jb.

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Date of creation: 01 Dec 2002
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Handle: RePEc:cdl:bineur:qt16g425jb
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.escholarship.org/repec/ies/

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  1. Kawai, Masahiro & Akiyama, Shigeru, 2000. "Implications of the currency crisis for exchange rate arrangements in emerging East Asia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2502, The World Bank.
  2. Parsons, Craig, 2002. "Showing Ideas as Causes: The Origins of the European Union," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(01), pages 47-84, December.
  3. Baer, Werner & Cavalcanti, Tiago & Silva, Peri, 2002. "Economic integration without policy coordination: the case of Mercosur," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 269-291, September.
  4. Buiter, Willem H., 1999. "The EMU and the NAMU: What is the Case for North American Monetary Union?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2181, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Takatoshi Ito & Eiji Ogawa & Yuri Nagataki Sasaki, 1999. "How Did the Dollar Peg Fail in Asia?," NBER Working Papers 6729, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Frederic S. Mishkin & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel, 2001. "One Decade of Inflation Targeting in the World: What Do We Know and What Do We Need to Know?," NBER Working Papers 8397, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Kawai, Masahiro & Takagi, Shinji, 2000. "Proposed strategy for a regional exchange rate arrangement in post-crisis East Asia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2503, The World Bank.
  8. Robert H. Porter & J. Douglas Zona, 1999. "Ohio School Milk Markets: An Analysis of Bidding," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 30(2), pages 263-288, Summer.
  9. Junichi Goto & Koichi Hamada, 1994. "Economic Preconditions for Asian Regional Integration," NBER Chapters, in: Macroeconomic Linkage: Savings, Exchange Rates, and Capital Flows, NBER-EASE Volume 3, pages 359-388 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Afonso S. Bevilaqua, 1997. "Macroeconomic coordination and commercial integration in MERCOSUR," Textos para discussão 378, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
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