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Money Demand in General Equilibrium Endogenous Growth: Estimating the Role of a Variable Interest Elasticity

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Abstract

The paper presents and tests a theory of the demand for money that is derived from a general equilibrium, endogenous growth economy, which in effect combines a special case of the shopping time exchange economy with the cash-in-advance framework. The model predicts that both higher inflation and financial innovation - that reduces the cost of credit - induce agents to substitute away from money towards exchange credit. The implied interest elasticity of money demand rises with the inflation rate and financial innovation rather than being constant as is typical in shopping time specifications. Using quarterly data for the US and Australia, we find evidence of cointegration for the money demand model. This money demand stability results because of the extra series that capture financial innovation,included are robustness checks and comparison to a standard money demand specification.

Suggested Citation

  • Gillman, Max & Otto, Glen, 2006. "Money Demand in General Equilibrium Endogenous Growth: Estimating the Role of a Variable Interest Elasticity," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2006/24, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section, revised Oct 2006.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdf:wpaper:2006/24
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    1. Milton Friedman, 1959. "The Demand for Money: Some Theoretical and Empirical Results," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie59-1.
    2. Barnett, William A., 1980. "Economic monetary aggregates an application of index number and aggregation theory," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, pages 11-48.
    3. Szilárd Benk & Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2008. "Money Velocity in an Endogenous Growth Business Cycle with Credit Shocks," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(6), pages 1281-1293, September.
    4. Gillman, M. & Siklos, P.L. & Silver, J.L., 1997. "Money Velocity with Costly Credit," Working Papers 97-4, Wilfrid Laurier University, Department of Economics.
    5. Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2004. "The Demand for Bank Reserves and Other Monetary Aggregates," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(3), pages 518-533, July.
    6. Max Gillman & Mark N. Harris & László Mátyás, 2004. "Inflation and growth: Explaining a negative effect," Empirical Economics, Springer, pages 149-167.
    7. Gillman M. & Siklos & P.L.Silver & J.L., 1996. "Money Velocity with Costly Credit," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 515, The University of Melbourne.
    8. Szilárd Benk & Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2005. "A Comparison Of Exchange Economies Within A Monetary Business Cycle," Manchester School, University of Manchester, pages 542-562.
    9. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    10. Clark, Jeffrey A, 1984. "Estimation of Economies of Scale in Banking Using a Generalized Functional Form," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 16(1), pages 53-68, February.
    11. Milton Friedman, 1959. "The Demand for Money: Some Theoretical and Empirical Results," NBER Chapters,in: The Demand for Money: Some Theoretical and Empirical Results, pages 1-29 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    13. Johansen, Soren, 1995. "Likelihood-Based Inference in Cointegrated Vector Autoregressive Models," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774501.
    14. Hancock, Diana, 1985. "The Financial Firm: Production with Monetary and Nonmonetary Goods," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(5), pages 859-880, October.
    15. Szilárd Benk & Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2005. "Credit Shocks in the Financial Deregulatory Era: Not the Usual Suspects," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 8(3), pages 668-687, July.
    16. Nelson C. Mark & Donggyu Sul, 2003. "Cointegration Vector Estimation by Panel DOLS and Long-run Money Demand," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(5), pages 655-680, December.
    17. Max Gillman & Mark N Harris & Michal Kejak, 2007. "The Interaction of Inflation and Financial Development with Endogenous Growth," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2006 29, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
    18. Dowd, Kevin, 1990. "The Value of Time and the Transactions Demand for Money," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 22(1), pages 51-64, February.
    19. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 3-42.
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    Cited by:

    1. Max Gillman & Michal Kejak & Michal Pakoš, 2015. "Learning about Rare Disasters: Implications For Consumption and Asset Prices," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, pages 1053-1104.
    2. Giulia Ghiani & Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2016. "Persistent Liquidity," Working Papers 1010, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Department of Economics.
    3. Giulia Ghiani & Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2014. "Money, Banking and Interest Rates: Monetary Policy Regimes with Markov-Switching VECM Evidence," Working Papers 1003, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Department of Economics.
    4. Gillman, Max & Kejak, Michal, 2008. "Inflation, Investment and Growth: a Banking Approach," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2008/18, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section, revised Oct 2008.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • O42 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Monetary Growth Models

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