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The Determinants of the Propensity to Receive Publicly Funded Home Care Services for the Elderly in Canada

Author

Listed:
  • Gustavo Mery
  • Walter Wodchis
  • Audrey Laporte

Abstract

Increases in Home Care (HC) services for the elderly have been a policy priority in recent decades. HC services include Home Health Care (HHC) and Homemaking/Personal Support (HM). We explored the interrelationship between receipt of publicly funded HM and HHC, and the determinants of the receipt of each type of services. A household home care decision model was extended, to develop an understanding of the demand for HHC and HM services separately and to include different household arrangements. Individual panel data for those aged 65 and over were derived from 9 biannual waves of the Canadian National Population Health Survey (1994-95 to 2010-11). A Panel Two-Stage Residual Inclusion method was used to estimate the likelihood of the receipt of HC services. Receipt of publicly funded HM is complementary with receipt of publicly funded HHC services after adjusting for functional and health status. Dependence on help with activities of daily living, health status, household arrangement, and income are determinants of the propensity to receive publicly funded HHC and HM services.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustavo Mery & Walter Wodchis & Audrey Laporte, 2014. "The Determinants of the Propensity to Receive Publicly Funded Home Care Services for the Elderly in Canada," Working Papers 140013, Canadian Centre for Health Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cch:wpaper:140013
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    File URL: http://www.canadiancentreforhealtheconomics.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Mery-et-al2.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Van Houtven, Courtney Harold & Norton, Edward C., 2008. "Informal care and Medicare expenditures: Testing for heterogeneous treatment effects," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 134-156, January.
    2. France Weaver & Sally C. Stearns & Edward C. Norton & William Spector, 2009. "Proximity to death and participation in the long-term care market," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(8), pages 867-883.
    3. van Campen, Cretien & Woittiez, Isolde B., 2003. "Client demands and the allocation of home care in the Netherlands. A multinomial logit model of client types, care needs and referrals," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 229-241, May.
    4. Terza, Joseph V. & Basu, Anirban & Rathouz, Paul J., 2008. "Two-stage residual inclusion estimation: Addressing endogeneity in health econometric modeling," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 531-543, May.
    5. Van Houtven, Courtney Harold & Norton, Edward C., 2004. "Informal care and health care use of older adults," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1159-1180, November.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    home care; elderly; long-term care; public provision; complementary effect; determinants;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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