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Explaining regional variation in home care use by demand and supply variables

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  • van Noort, Olivier
  • Schotanus, Fredo
  • van de Klundert, Joris
  • Telgen, Jan

Abstract

In the Netherlands, home care services like district nursing and personal assistance are provided by private service provider organizations and covered by private health insurance companies which bear legal responsibility for purchasing these services. To improve value for money, their procurement increasingly replaces fee-for-service payments with population based budgets. Setting appropriate population budgets requires adaptation to the legitimate needs of the population, whereas historical costs are likely to be influenced by supply factors as well, not all of which are necessarily legitimate. Our purpose is to explain home care costs in terms of demand and supply factors. This allows for adjusting historical cost patterns when setting population based budgets.

Suggested Citation

  • van Noort, Olivier & Schotanus, Fredo & van de Klundert, Joris & Telgen, Jan, 2018. "Explaining regional variation in home care use by demand and supply variables," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 140-146.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:122:y:2018:i:2:p:140-146
    DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2017.05.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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