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Frictions Lead to Sorting: a Partnership Model with On-the-Match Search

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  • Cristian Bartolucci
  • Ignacio Monzon

Abstract

We present a partnership model where heterogeneous agents bargain over the gains from trade and search on the match. Frictions allow agents to extract higher rents from more productive partners, generating an endogenous preference for high types. More productive agents upgrade their partners faster, therefore the equilibrium match distribution features positive assortative matching. Frictions are commonly understood to hamper sorting. Instead, we show how frictions generate positive sorting even with a submodular production function. Our results challenge the interpretation of positive assortative matching as evidence of complementarity.

Suggested Citation

  • Cristian Bartolucci & Ignacio Monzon, 2014. "Frictions Lead to Sorting: a Partnership Model with On-the-Match Search," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 385, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
  • Handle: RePEc:cca:wpaper:385
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cristian Bartolucci, 2013. "Gender Wage Gaps Reconsidered: A Structural Approach Using Matched Employer-Employee Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(4), pages 998-1034.
    2. Rafael Lopes de Melo, 2018. "Firm Wage Differentials and Labor Market Sorting: Reconciling Theory and Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 126(1), pages 313-346.
    3. Nobuhiro Kiyotaki & Ricardo Lagos, 2007. "A Model of Job and Worker Flows," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115(5), pages 770-819, October.
    4. Albaek, Karsten & Sorensen, Bent E, 1998. "Worker Flows and Job Flows in Danish Manufacturing, 1980-91," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(451), pages 1750-1771, November.
    5. Cristian Bartolucci & Francesco Devicienti, 2012. "Better Workers Move to Better Firms: A Simple Test to Identify Sorting," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 259, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    6. Alp E. Atakan, 2006. "Assortative Matching with Explicit Search Costs," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(3), pages 667-680, May.
    7. Becker, Gary S, 1973. "A Theory of Marriage: Part I," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(4), pages 813-846, July-Aug..
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    Cited by:

    1. Cristian Bartolucci & Francesco Devicienti & Ignacio Monzón, 2018. "Identifying Sorting in Practice," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 408-438, October.
    2. Devereux, Kevin, 2018. "Identifying the value of teamwork: Application to professional tennis," CLEF Working Paper Series 14, Canadian Labour Economics Forum (CLEF), University of Waterloo.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Assortative matching; Search frictions; On-the-match search; Bargaining;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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