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Transfers to Households with Children and Child Development

  • Daniela Del Boca
  • Christopher Flinn
  • Matthew Wiswall

In this paper we utilize a model of household investments in the cognitive development of children to explore the impact of various transfer policies on the distribution of child cognitive outcomes in target populations. We develop a cost criterion that can be used to compare the cost effectiveness of unrestricted, restricted, and conditional cash transfer systems, and find that conditional cash transfers are the most cost efficient way to attain any given gain in average child quality in a target population. Of course, this is only true if one uses efficiently designed cash transfer systems, and we are able to explore their design using our modeling framework.

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File URL: http://www.carloalberto.org/assets/working-papers/no.273.pdf
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Paper provided by Collegio Carlo Alberto in its series Carlo Alberto Notebooks with number 273.

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Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cca:wpaper:273
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  1. Flavio Cunha & James J. Heckman, 2008. "Formulating, Identifying and Estimating the Technology of Cognitive and Noncognitive Skill Formation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(4).
  2. Behrman, Jere R & Sengupta, Piyali & Todd, Petra, 2005. "Progressing through PROGRESA: An Impact Assessment of a School Subsidy Experiment in Rural Mexico," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(1), pages 237-75, October.
  3. Schady, Norbert & Araujo, Maria Caridad, 2006. "Cash transfers, conditions, school enrollment, and child work : evidence from a randomized experiment in Ecuador," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3930, The World Bank.
  4. Kenneth I. Wolpin & Petra E. Todd, 2006. "Assessing the Impact of a School Subsidy Program in Mexico: Using a Social Experiment to Validate a Dynamic Behavioral Model of Child Schooling and Fertility," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1384-1417, December.
  5. Del Boca, Daniela & Flinn, Christopher & Wiswall, Matthew, 2010. "Household Choices and Child Development," IZA Discussion Papers 5155, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Katrine V. L�ken & Magne Mogstad & Matthew Wiswall, 2012. "What Linear Estimators Miss: The Effects of Family Income on Child Outcomes," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 1-35, April.
  7. Heckman, James J. & Pinto, Rodrigo & Shaikh, Azeem M. & Yavitz, Adam, 2011. "Inference with Imperfect Randomization: The Case of the Perry Preschool Program," IZA Discussion Papers 5625, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Cesar Martinelli & Susan W. Parker, 2003. "Should Transfers To Poor Families Be Conditional On School Attendance? A Household Bargaining Perspective," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(2), pages 523-544, 05.
  9. Skoufias, Emmanuel & Parker, Susan W., 2001. "Conditional cash transfers and their impact on child work and schooling," FCND discussion papers 123, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  10. Eliana Cardoso & Andre Portela Souza, 2004. "The Impact of Cash Transfers on Child Labor and School Attendance in Brazil," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0407, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  11. Jere H. Behrman & Susan W. Parker & Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2012. "Aligning Learning Incentives of Students and Teachers: Results from a Social Experiment in Mexican High Schools," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-004, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  12. Fernald, Lia C.H. & Hidrobo, Melissa, 2011. "Effect of Ecuador's cash transfer program (Bono de Desarrollo Humano) on child development in infants and toddlers: A randomized effectiveness trial," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(9), pages 1437-1446, May.
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