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Life-Cycle Portfolio Choice with Liquid and Illiquid Financial Assets

  • Claudio Campanale
  • Carolina Fugazza
  • Francisco Gomes

Traditionally quantitative models that have studied households' port- folio choice have focused exclusively on the different risk properties of alternative financial assets. In the present paper we take a different ap- proach and assume that assets also differ in their liquidity. We construct a model where agents face uninsurable idiosyncratic shocks to labor earn- ings. Earnings are paid in the form of a liquid asset that is needed to buy consumption goods. A second, risky asset, called stock is also available, however a fixed transaction cost is needed to buy or sell this asset. When the transaction cost is calibrated to match the observed infrequency in households' trading, the model generates patterns of portfolio stock allo- cations over age and wealth that are constant or moderately increasing, thus more in line with the empirical evidence compared to conventional models.

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Paper provided by Collegio Carlo Alberto in its series Carlo Alberto Notebooks with number 269.

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Length: 52 pages
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cca:wpaper:269
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  1. Pierre‐André Chiappori & Monica Paiella, 2011. "Relative Risk Aversion Is Constant: Evidence From Panel Data," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 9(6), pages 1021-1052, December.
  2. Calvet, Laurent E. & Campbell, John Y. & Sodini, Paolo, 2006. "Down or Out: Assessing The Welfare Costs of Household Investment Mistakes," Working Paper Series 195, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
  3. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Stefan Nagel, 2006. "Do Wealth Fluctuations Generate Time-varying Risk Aversion? Micro-Evidence on Individuals' Asset Allocation," NBER Working Papers 12809, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Bilias, Yannis & Georgarakos, Dimitris & Haliassos, Michael, 2006. "Portfolio inertia and stock market fluctuations," CFS Working Paper Series 2006/14, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  5. David A. Love, 2010. "The Effects of Marital Status and Children on Savings and Portfolio Choice," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 23(1), pages 385-432, January.
  6. Alexander Michaelides & Francisco J. Gomes, 2005. "Optimal life cycle asset allocation : understanding the empirical evidence," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 193, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  7. Carol Bertaut & Martha Starr-McCluer, 2000. "Household portfolios in the United States," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-26, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  8. Ahmet Akyol, 2000. "Optimal Monetary Policy in an Economy with Incomplete Markets and Idiosyncratic Shocks," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0796, Econometric Society.
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