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Consumption smoothing and portfolio rebalancing: The effects of adjustment costs

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  • Bonaparte, Yosef
  • Cooper, Russell
  • Zhu, Guozhong

Abstract

A household's response to income and return shocks depends on the costs of portfolio adjustment. In particular, the extent of portfolio rebalancing and consumption smoothing are influenced by the presence of non-convex portfolio adjustment costs. Suppose bonds can be adjusted costlessly while adjustments to stock accounts entail adjustment costs. Due to these portfolio adjustment costs, the household demands both stocks and bonds. A household can buffer some income fluctuations without incurring adjustment costs and engage in costly portfolio rebalancing less frequently. Using the estimated preference parameters and portfolio adjustment costs, the response to income and return shocks is nonlinear and reflects the interaction of portfolio rebalancing and consumption smoothing.

Suggested Citation

  • Bonaparte, Yosef & Cooper, Russell & Zhu, Guozhong, 2012. "Consumption smoothing and portfolio rebalancing: The effects of adjustment costs," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(8), pages 751-768.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:59:y:2012:i:8:p:751-768
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmoneco.2012.10.012
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    Cited by:

    1. Marekwica, Marcel & Schaefer, Alexander & Sebastian, Steffen, 2013. "Life cycle asset allocation in the presence of housing and tax-deferred investing," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1110-1125.
    2. Yu, Jihai & Zhu, Guozhong, 2013. "How uncertain is household income in China," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(1), pages 74-78.
    3. Campanale, Claudio & Fugazza, Carolina & Gomes, Francisco, 2015. "Life-cycle portfolio choice with liquid and illiquid financial assets," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 67-83.
    4. Andreas Tischbirek, 2016. "Long-Term Government Debt and Household Portfolio Composition," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 16.17, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
    5. Russell Cooper & Guozhong Zhu, 2016. "Household Finance over the Life-Cycle: What does Education Contribute?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 20, pages 63-89, April.
    6. Campanale, Claudio & Fugazza, Carolina & Gomes, Francisco J, 2015. "Life-Cycle Portfolio choice with Liquid and Illiquid Assets," CEPR Discussion Papers 10369, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions

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