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Consumption Smoothing and Portfolio Rebalancing: The Effects of Adjustment Costs

Listed author(s):
  • Yosef Bonaparte
  • Russell Cooper
  • Guozhong Zhu

This paper studies the dynamics of portfolio rebalancing and consumption smoothing in the presence of non-convex portfolio adjustment costs. The goal is to understand a household's response to income and return shocks. The model includes the choice of two assets: one riskless without adjustment costs and a second risky asset with adjustment costs. With these multiple assets, a household can buffer some income fluctuations through the asset without adjustment costs and engage in costly portfolio rebalancing less frequently. We estimate both preference parameters and portfolio adjustment costs. The estimates are used for evaluating consumption smoothing and portfolio adjustment in the face of income and return shocks.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w16957.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16957.

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Date of creation: Apr 2011
Publication status: published as Bonaparte, Yosef & Cooper, Russell & Zhu, Guozhong, 2012. "Consumption smoothing and portfolio rebalancing: The effects of adjustment costs," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(8), pages 751-768.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16957
Note: EFG
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