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A Bias-Adjusted LM Test of Error Cross Section Independence

Author

Listed:
  • Pesaran, M.H.
  • Ullah, A.
  • Yamagata. T.

Abstract

This paper proposes bias-adjusted normal approximation versions of Lagrange multiplier (NLM) test of error cross section independence of Breusch and Pagan (1980) in the case of panel models with strictly exogenous regressors and normal errors. The exact mean and variance of the Lagrange multiplier (LM) test statistic are provided for the purpose of the bias-adjustments, and it is shown that the proposed tests have a standard normal distribution for the fixed time series dimension (T) as the cross section dimension (N) tends to infinity. Importantly, the proposed bias-adjusted NLM tests are consistent even when the Pesaran’s (2004) CD test is inconsistent. The finite sample evidence shows that the bias adjusted NLM tests successfully control the size, maintaining satisfactory power. However, it is also shown that the bias-adjusted NLM tests are not as robust as the CD test to non-normal errors and/or in the presence of weakly exogenous regressors.

Suggested Citation

  • Pesaran, M.H. & Ullah, A. & Yamagata. T., 2006. "A Bias-Adjusted LM Test of Error Cross Section Independence," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0641, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0641
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2021. "General diagnostic tests for cross-sectional dependence in panels," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 60(1), pages 13-50, January.
    2. Frees, Edward W., 1995. "Assessing cross-sectional correlation in panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 393-414, October.
    3. T. S. Breusch & A. R. Pagan, 1980. "The Lagrange Multiplier Test and its Applications to Model Specification in Econometrics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 239-253.
    4. Ullah, Aman, 2004. "Finite Sample Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774488.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cross Section Dependence; Spatial Dependence; LM test; Panel Model; Bias-adjusted Test;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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