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The Politics of the diffusion of Conditional Cash Transfers in Latin America

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  • Paola Pena

Abstract

Abstract Is the emergence and rapid expansion of Conditional Cash Transfers (CCTs) in Latin America associated with the turn to the left in Latin American politics? The paper applies a modified version of the Dolowitz and Marsh (2000) Policy Transfer Framework to successive waves of policy diffusion in nineteen countries in the region. The analysis did not find a “New Left” footprint in the motivations, actors, and lesson-drawing processes that characterised the expansion of CCTs. It concludes that social assistance is at the top of the agenda of governments in Latin America regardless of the ideological leaning of ruling coalitions.

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  • Paola Pena, 2014. "The Politics of the diffusion of Conditional Cash Transfers in Latin America," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 20114, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:bwp:bwppap:20114
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dan Levy & Jim Ohls, 2010. "Evaluation of Jamaica's PATH conditional cash transfer programme," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(4), pages 421-441.
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    3. Baez Ramirez,Javier Eduardo & Camacho,Adriana & Conover, Emily & Zarate,Roman Andres, 2012. "Conditional cash transfers, political participation, and voting behavior," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6215, The World Bank.
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    5. Fried, Brian J., 2012. "Distributive Politics and Conditional Cash Transfers: The Case of Brazil’s Bolsa Família," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 1042-1053.
    6. Gustavo Canavire Bacarreza & Harold Vasquez Ruiz, 2013. "Labour Supply Effects of Conditional Transfers: Analyzing the Dominican Republic's Solidarity," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO CIEF 010732, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT.
    7. Suzanne Duryea & Andrew Morrison, 2004. "The Effect of Conditional Transfers on School Performance and Child Labor: Evidence from an Ex-Post Impact Evaluation in Costa Rica," Research Department Publications 4359, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    8. Barrientos, Armando & Nino-Zarazua, Miguel, 2010. "Social Assistance in Developing Countries Database Version 5.0," MPRA Paper 20001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Rafael Perez Ribas & Guilherme Issamu Hirata & Fabio Veras Soares, 2008. "Debating Targeting Methods for Cash Transfers: A Multidimensional Index vs. an Income Proxy for Paraguay?s Tekoporã Programme," Publications 2, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
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    11. Bruno Martorano & Marco Sanfilippo, 2012. "Innovative Features in Conditional Cash Transfers: An impact evaluation of Chile Solidario on households and children," Papers inwopa656, Innocenti Working Papers.
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    13. Fabio Veras Soares & Tatiana Britto, 2007. "Confronting Capacity Constraints on Conditional Cash Transfers in Latin America: the cases of El Salvador and Paraguay," Working Papers 38, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    14. Simone Cecchini & Claudia Robles & Luis Hernán Vargas, 2012. "The Expansion of Cash Transfers in Chile and its Challenges: Ethical Family Income," Policy Research Brief 26, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    15. Cecchini, Simone & Martínez, Rodrigo, 2011. "Protección social inclusiva en América Latina : una mirada integral, un enfoque de derechos," Libros de la CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 111 edited by Cepal.
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    18. Orazio Attanasio & Emla Fitzsimons & Ana Gómez & Martha Isabel Gutierrez & Costas Meghir & Alice Mesnard, 2006. "Child education and work choices in the presence of a conditional cash transfer programme in rural Colombia," IFS Working Papers W06/13, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alfredo Saad-Filho, 2015. "Social Policy for Neoliberalism: The Bolsa Família Programme in Brazil," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 46(6), pages 1227-1252, November.
    2. Pedro Mendes Loureiro, 2016. "Reformism, Class Conciliation And The Pink Tide: Prospects For The Working Classes Under Left-Of-Centre Governments In Latin America," Anais do XLIII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 43rd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 020, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].

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