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Labour Elasticity in V4 countries: Structural decomposition analysis

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  • Martin Lábaj

    () (University of Economics in Bratislava, Faculty of National Economy, Department of Economic Policy)

  • Karol Morvay
  • Martin Hudcovský

Abstract

In the present paper, we analyse determinants of labour elasticity in V4 countries. While the standard approach relies on the parametric estimation of labour elasticity coefficients, we employ a novel approach based on structural decomposition analysis. This allows us to identify several determinants that mitigate the effects of economic growth on employment. We decompose the overall change in employment into the contribution of six factors: changes in labour productivity, changes in import of intermediate products, changes in the structure of production, changes in the final demand structure by industries and by sectors, and a change in final demand volume. We show that besides generally accepted influence of labour productivity growth on employment other factors such as structural changes and changes in final demand played an important role in employment changes. These results shed some light on low labour elasticity in V4 countries that goes beyond the simple labour productivity growth argument.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Lábaj & Karol Morvay & Martin Hudcovský, 2015. "Labour Elasticity in V4 countries: Structural decomposition analysis," Department of Economic Policy Working Paper Series 009, Department of Economic Policy, Faculty of National Economy, University of Economics in Bratislava.
  • Handle: RePEc:brt:depwps:009
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    structural decomposition analysis; labour elasticity; V4 countries; input-output analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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