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TFP Growth in Turkey Revisited: The E§ect of Informal Sector

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  • Orhan Erem Atesagaoglu
  • Ceyhun Elgin
  • Oðuz Öztunalý

Abstract

In this paper, we aim to contribute to the growth literature by presenting evidence that the presence of an informal sector might significantly affect both the level as well as the course of the total factor productivity (TFP). To this end, we develop a framework where we can compare the TFP in Turkey generated by a one-sector benchmark model to the one originating from an extended model with the presence of formal and informal labor. Our results indicate that, over the course of 1950–2014, the TFP generated by the benchmark model generally underestimates the productivity of the formal sector and this underestimation is mainly observed and is widened after 1980. Moreover, we also find that the substitution between formal and informal labor significantly affects this underestimation.
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  • Orhan Erem Atesagaoglu & Ceyhun Elgin & Oðuz Öztunalý, 2017. "TFP Growth in Turkey Revisited: The E§ect of Informal Sector," Working Papers 2017/01, Bogazici University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bou:wpaper:2017/01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Çiçek, Deniz & Elgin, Ceyhun, 2011. "Not-quite-great depressions of Turkey: A quantitative analysis of economic growth over 1968–2004," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2691-2700.
    2. Abdelhak Senhadji, 2000. "Sources of Economic Growth: An Extensive Growth Accounting Exercise," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 47(1), pages 1-6.
    3. Murat Üngör, 2014. "Some Observations on the Convergence Experience of Turkey," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 56(4), pages 696-719, December.
    4. Yusuf Soner Baskaya & Timur Hulagu, 2011. "Informal-Formal Worker Wage Gap in Turkey : Evidence From A Semi-Parametric Approach," Working Papers 1115, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
    5. Prescott, Edward C, 1998. "Needed: A Theory of Total Factor Productivity," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(3), pages 525-551, August.
    6. Ceyhun Elgin & Oguz Oztunali, 2012. "Shadow Economies around the World: Model Based Estimates," Working Papers 2012/05, Bogazici University, Department of Economics.
    7. Ayse Imrohoroglu, 2009. "Growth Facts in Turkey," 2009 Meeting Papers 1275, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tamkoc,Mehmet Nazim, 2022. "Bribery, Plant Size and Size Dependent Distortions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 10159, The World Bank.
    2. Attar, M. Aykut, 2021. "Growth, distribution and dynamic inefficiency in Turkey: An analysis of the naïve neoclassical theory of capital," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 20-30.
    3. Rajeev K. Goel & Ummad Mazhar & Rati Ram, 2022. "Informal competition and firm performance: Impacts on input‐ versus output performance," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 43(2), pages 418-430, March.
    4. Ceyhun Elgin & Ferda Erturk, 2019. "Informal economies around the world: measures, determinants and consequences," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 9(2), pages 221-237, June.

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