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One hundred and thirty years of central bank cooperation: a BIS perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Claudio E. V. Borio
  • Gianni Toniolo

    (University of Rome II - Faculty of Economics)

Abstract

With the insight of 130 years of history, this paper tries to answer three questions: how did changing international monetary and financial conditions shape the targets and tools of central bank cooperation? What factors influenced its intensity? Did a structured organisation, such as the BIS, make a difference to its effectiveness? We show that while central bank cooperation through history was ultimately directed to ensuring monetary and financial stability, the conception of these objectives, the relationship between the two, the balance in their pursuit, and the strategies followed evolved over time reflecting changes in the monetary and financial environment as well as in the intellectual climate. In turn, the intensity of central bank cooperation was influenced by the state of international relations, the prestige and degree of autonomy of central banks and the technical nature of the issues requiring cooperation. We also argue that the BIS made a material difference, at least when conditions allowed.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudio E. V. Borio & Gianni Toniolo, 2006. "One hundred and thirty years of central bank cooperation: a BIS perspective," BIS Working Papers 197, Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:biswps:197
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/648 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Marc Flandreau, 1997. "Central Bank Cooperation in Historical Perspective: A Sceptical View," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 50(4), pages 735-763, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hookyu Rhu & C.S. Lim Vincent & L.C. Ong Vivien, 2012. "Rethink Policy Collaboration," Staff Papers, South East Asian Central Banks (SEACEN) Research and Training Centre, number sp88, April.
    2. William A. Allen & Richhild Moessner, 2010. "Central Bank co-operation and International liquidity in the financial crisis of 2008-09," FMG Special Papers sp187, Financial Markets Group.
    3. Claudio Borio, 2011. "The financial crisis: what implications for new statistics?," IFC Bulletins chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Proceedings of the IFC Conference on "Initiatives to address data gaps revealed by the financial crisis", Basel, 25-26 August 2010, volume 34, pages 1-8 Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Eufrocinio M. Bernabe, Jr, 2012. "Framework for Macro-prudential Policies for Emerging Economies in a Globalized Environment," Research Studies, South East Asian Central Banks (SEACEN) Research and Training Centre, number rp88, April.
    5. Claudio Borio, 2013. "The Great Financial Crisis: Setting priorities for new statistics," Journal of Banking Regulation, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 14(3-4), pages 306-317, July.
    6. Ivo Maes, 2010. "Alexandre Lamfalussy and the origins of the BIS macro-prudential approach to financial stability," PSL Quarterly Review, Economia civile, vol. 63(254), pages 265-292.
    7. Gianni Toniolo & Eugene N. White, 2015. "The Evolution of the Financial Stability Mandate: From Its Origins to the Present Day," NBER Working Papers 20844, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. C. Randall Henning, 2011. "Coordinating Regional and Multilateral Financial Institutions," Working Paper Series WP11-9, Peterson Institute for International Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cooperation; Bank for International Settlements; gold standard; Bretton Woods; monetary and financial stability; central bank;

    JEL classification:

    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • N20 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • N40 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - General, International, or Comparative

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