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Black Man’s Burden: Measured Philanthropy in the British Empire, 1880-1913

  • Accominotti, Olivier
  • Flandreau, Marc
  • Rezzik, Riad
  • Zumer, Frédéric

Ferguson and Schularick (2006) recently provided a measure of the effect of Empire subjection on borrowing countries’ interest rates. They find this effect to be large and significant, ranging between 80 to 180 basis points. We argue that their methodology is inadequate and that their estimates are biased. The reason is that Empire subjection did not affect borrowing conditions at the margin, as they assume, but structurally. We also develop a new approach of the incidence of colonial rule on market access. It suggests that the benefits of Empire were unevenly distributed. It shows that the main incidence of colonial rule was to create financial incentives to adopt development policies that encouraged government spending.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 6811.

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Date of creation: Apr 2008
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:6811
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  1. Flandreau, Marc, 2006. "The Logic of Compromise: Monetary bargaining in Austria-Hungary 1867-1913," CEPR Discussion Papers 5397, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Bordo, Michael D. & Rockoff, Hugh, 1996. "The Gold Standard as a “Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval”," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(02), pages 389-428, June.
  3. Easterlin, Richard A., 1981. "Why Isn't the Whole World Developed?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(01), pages 1-17, March.
  4. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 2002. "Tropics, Germs, and Crops: How Endowments Influence Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 9106, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Engerman, Stanley L. & Sokoloff, Kenneth L., 2005. "The Evolution of Suffrage Institutions in the New World," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 65(04), pages 891-921, December.
  6. Kris James Mitchener & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2007. "The Baring Crisis and the Great Latin American Meltdown of the 1890s," NBER Working Papers 13403, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Obstfeld, Maurice & Taylor, Alan M., 2003. "Sovereign Risk, Credibility and the Gold Standard: 1870-1913 versus 1925-31," CEPR Discussion Papers 3688, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Flandreau, Marc & Le Cacheux, Jacques & Zumer, Frédéric, 1998. "Stability Without a Pact? Lessons from the European Gold Standard 1880-1914," CEPR Discussion Papers 1872, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Michael A. Clemens & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2004. "Wealth bias in the first global capital market boom, 1870-1913," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(495), pages 304-337, 04.
  10. Andrew Porter, 1981. "Britain, the Cape Colony, and Natal, 1870–1914: Capital, Shipping, and the Imperial Connexion," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 34(4), pages 554-577, November.
  11. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "Reversal of Fortune: Geography and Institutions in the Making of the Modern World Income Distribution," NBER Working Papers 8460, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Juan Braun-Llona & Matías Braun-Llona & Ignacio Briones & José Díaz & Rolf Lüders & Gert Wagner, . "Economía Chilena 1810-1995. Estadísticas Históricas," Documentos de Trabajo 187, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
  13. Hansen, Bent, 1983. "Interest Rates and Foreign Capital in Egypt Under British Occupation," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 43(04), pages 867-884, December.
  14. Flandreau, Marc & Flores Zendejas, Juan Huitzilihuitl & Gaillard, Norbert, 2007. "Bonds and Brands: Lessons from the 1820s," CEPR Discussion Papers 6420, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521529167 is not listed on IDEAS
  16. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521821759 is not listed on IDEAS
  17. Marc Flandreau, 2005. "Home Biases, 19th Century Style," Sciences Po publications n°5398, Sciences Po.
  18. Stanley L. Engerman & Stephen H. Haber & Kenneth L. Sokoloff, 2000. "Inequality, institution and differential paths of growth among New World economies," Chapters, in: Institutions, Contracts and Organizations, chapter 11 Edward Elgar.
  19. Paolo Mauro & Nathan Sussman & Yishay Yafeh, 2002. "Emerging Market Spreads: Then Versus Now," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(2), pages 695-733, May.
  20. Kris James Mitchener & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2005. "Supersanctions and Sovereign Debt Repayment," NBER Working Papers 11472, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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