IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bdp/wpaper/1.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Unobservable investments, limited commitment, and the curse of firm relocation

Author

Listed:
  • Martin Pollrich

    () (Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Economics)

  • Robert Schmidt

    () (Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Economics)

Abstract

Changes in market conditions or policies can induce firms to relocate. Countries may intervene by subsidizing domestic rms. We analyze a dynamic game where a regulator oers contracts to avert relocation of a rm in each of two periods. The firm can undertake an investment that is unobservable to the regulator, while contracts are contingent on an observable productive activity. Under limited commitment it is impossible to implement outcomes with positive transfers in the second period. To circumvent this problem, the regulator can tighten the regulation of the firm in the first period to induce a larger investment (lock-in effect).

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Pollrich & Robert Schmidt, 2014. "Unobservable investments, limited commitment, and the curse of firm relocation," Working Papers 2014004, Berlin Doctoral Program in Economics and Management Science (BDPEMS).
  • Handle: RePEc:bdp:wpaper:1
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://repec.bdpems.de/repec/bdp/wpaper/pdf/WP_2014-04.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rey, Patrick & Salanie, Bernard, 1990. "Long-term, Short-term and Renegotiation: On the Value of Commitment in Contracting," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(3), pages 597-619, May.
    2. Bergemann, Dirk & Hege, Ulrich, 1998. "Venture capital financing, moral hazard, and learning," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(6-8), pages 703-735, August.
    3. Motta, Massimo & Thisse, Jacques-Francois, 1994. "Does environmental dumping lead to delocation?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 563-576, April.
    4. Xavier Freixas & Roger Guesnerie & Jean Tirole, 1985. "Planning under Incomplete Information and the Ratchet Effect," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(2), pages 173-191.
    5. Schmidt, Robert C. & Heitzig, Jobst, 2014. "Carbon leakage: Grandfathering as an incentive device to avert firm relocation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 209-223.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Nachtigall, 2016. "Climate policy under firm relocation: The implications of phasing out free allowances," Working Papers 2016007, Berlin Doctoral Program in Economics and Management Science (BDPEMS).
    2. Nachtigall, Daniel, 2016. "Climate policy under firm relocation: The implications of phasing out free allowances," Discussion Papers 2016/25, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    moral hazard; contract theory; limited commitment; firrm mobility; abatement capital;

    JEL classification:

    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • D86 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Economics of Contract Law
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bdp:wpaper:1. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jenny Schmiedel) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Jenny Schmiedel to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/bdpemde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.