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Employment polarisation in Spain over the course of the 1997-2012 cycle

Author

Listed:
  • Brindusa Anghel

    (FEDEA)

  • Sara de la Rica

    (UPV/EHU & FEDEA)

  • Aitor Lacuesta

    (Banco de España)

Abstract

This article analyses changes in the occupational employment share in Spain for the period 1997-2012 and the way particular sociodemographics adapt to those changes. There seems to be clear evidence of employment polarisation between 1997 and 2012, which accelerates over the recession. Changes in the composition of the labour supply cannot explain the increase in the share of occupations at the low end of the wage distribution. Sector reallocation might have partially contributed to explaining the polarisation process in Spain during the years of expansion (1997-2007), but it is a minor factor during the recession. The polarisation of occupations within sectors observed especially during the recession appear to be related to a decline in routine tasks. This is compensated by an increase in occupations with non-routine service contents, which are found both at the low and high end of the wage distribution. Instead, abstract content-intensive jobs do not appear to increase their share in total employment during these 15 years. The paper finds that this process has affected males more than females because of the higher concentration of the former in more routine-intensive occupations. Among males, for workers under 30 years we fi nd a decrease in the share of occupations with more routine tasks, which turns into increases in others with more abstract content and particularly with more nonroutine service content. Instead, male workers over 30 years seem to remain in declining occupations to a greater extent. Females of different ages are not affected by the abovementioned changes.

Suggested Citation

  • Brindusa Anghel & Sara de la Rica & Aitor Lacuesta, 2013. "Employment polarisation in Spain over the course of the 1997-2012 cycle," Working Papers 1321, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
  • Handle: RePEc:bde:wpaper:1321
    as

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    File URL: http://www.bde.es/f/webbde/SES/Secciones/Publicaciones/PublicacionesSeriadas/DocumentosTrabajo/13/Fich/dt1321e.pdf
    File Function: First version, December 2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Raquel Carrasco & Juan F. Jimeno & A. Carolina Ortega, 2011. "Accounting for changes in the Spanish wage distribution: the role of employment Composition effects," Working Papers 1120, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    2. Stéphane Bonhomme & Laura Hospido, 2013. "Earnings inequality in Spain: new evidence using tax data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(30), pages 4212-4225, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maximo Camacho & Jaime Martinez-Martin, 2014. "Real-time forecasting US GDP from small-scale factor models," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(1), pages 347-364, August.
    2. Mariya Hake & Fernando Lopez-Vicente & Luis Molina, 2014. "Do the Drivers of Loan Dollarization Differ between CESEE and Latin America? A Meta-Analysis," Focus on European Economic Integration, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 1, pages 8-35.
    3. Camacho, Maximo & Martinez-Martin, Jaime, 2015. "Monitoring the world business cycle," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 617-625.
    4. Campos, Rodolfo G. & Reggio, Iliana, 2015. "Consumption in the shadow of unemployment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 39-54.
    5. repec:eee:moneco:v:88:y:2017:i:c:p:15-34 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Miguel García-Posada & Marcos Marchetti, 2015. "The bank lending channel of unconventional monetary policy: the impact of the VLTROs on credit supply in Spain," Working Papers 1512, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    7. Ángel Estrada & Daniel Garrote & Eva Valdeolivas & Javier Vallés, 2015. "Household Debt and Uncertainty: Private Consumption after the Great Recession," Monetaria, Centro de Estudios Monetarios Latinoamericanos, CEMLA, vol. 0(1), pages 71-109, january-j.
    8. Teresa Sastre & Francesca Viani, 2014. "Countries’ safety and competitiveness, and the estimation of current account misalignments," Working Papers 1401, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    9. María J. Nieto, 2014. "Third-country relations in the directive establishing a framework for the recovery and resolution of credit institutions," Working Papers 1409, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    10. Andrés, Javier & Arce, Óscar & Thomas, Carlos, 2017. "Structural reforms in a debt overhang," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 15-34.
    11. Javier Andrés & Pablo Burriel, 2014. "Inflation dynamics in a model with firm entry and (some) heterogeneity," Working Papers 1427, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    12. Campos, Rodolfo G. & Reggio, Iliana, 2014. "Measurement error in imputation procedures," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 197-202.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    employment polarisation; job tasks; routinisation; business cycle;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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