IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Does trade shrink the measure of domestic firms?

Listed author(s):
  • João Barata R. B. Barroso

Does international trade shrink the steady state measure of domestic firms? The most recent models with heterogeneous firms suggest it does (Melitz (2003), Chaney (2007) and Arkolakis (2008)). The main force at work in such models is the selection of the fittest, with the least efficient firms exiting the market. Within the same class of models with heterogeneous firm productivity and strong selection effects, both in the consumption goods and the intermediate goods sectors, this paper shows that the measure of domestic firms may actually expand. The result is robust to the particular production function used to bundle labor and intermediate goods

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.bcb.gov.br/pec/wps/ingl/wps332.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department in its series Working Papers Series with number 332.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: Nov 2013
Handle: RePEc:bcb:wpaper:332
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.bcb.gov.br/?english

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Ulf Lewrick & Lukas Mohler & Rolf Weder, 2011. "International Trade in Variety and Domestic Production," Working papers 2011/03, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  2. Brambilla, Irene, 2009. "Multinationals, technology, and the introduction of varieties of goods," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 89-101, September.
  3. Andrew B. Bernard & Stephen J. Redding & Peter K. Schott, 2011. "Multiproduct Firms and Trade Liberalization," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(3), pages 1271-1318.
  4. Ardelean, Adina & Lugovskyy, Volodymyr, 2010. "Domestic productivity and variety gains from trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 280-291, March.
  5. Kasahara, Hiroyuki & Rodrigue, Joel, 2008. "Does the use of imported intermediates increase productivity? Plant-level evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 106-118, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bcb:wpaper:332. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Francisco Marcos Rodrigues Figueiredo)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.