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The Long-Term Economic Costs of the Great London Smog

Author

Listed:
  • Alastair Ball

    (Birkbeck, University of London)

Abstract

This paper studies the long-term economic effects of early exposure to the Great London Smog of 1952. Cohorts born in London are tracked for up to sixty years using the Office of National Statistics Longitudinal Study. Exposure to the four day smog reduced the size of the surviving cohort by 2% and caused lasting damage to human capital accumulation, employment, hours of work, and propensity to develop cancer.

Suggested Citation

  • Alastair Ball, 2018. "The Long-Term Economic Costs of the Great London Smog," Birkbeck Working Papers in Economics and Finance 1814, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bbk:bbkefp:1814
    as

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    File URL: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/25352
    File Function: First version, 2018
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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