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Government Fiscal Policies and Redistribution in Asian Countries

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Abstract

This paper assesses the impact of government fiscal policies on income inequality in Asia. It discusses the role and effectiveness of redistributive fiscal policies and quantifies the effects of taxation and government expenditure on income distributions. Panel estimation for 150 countries with data between 1970 and 2009 confirms international empirical findings for Asia. Tax systems tend to be progressive but government expenditures are a more effective tool for redistributing income. Moreover, the results suggest some distinctive differential distributive effect for government expenditure on social protection in Asia. Social protection spending appears to increase income inequality, whereas it reduces it in the rest of the world. Also, adversely affecting the distribution of income in Asia is government expenditure on housing. Some options for improving the effectiveness of fiscal policies in Asia are discussed.
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  • Iris Claus & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & VIoleta Vulovic, 2012. "Government Fiscal Policies and Redistribution in Asian Countries," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1213, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  • Handle: RePEc:ays:ispwps:paper1213
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    Cited by:

    1. John C. Anyanwu, 2016. "Empirical Analysis of the Main Drivers of Income Inequality in Southern Africa," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 17(2), pages 337-364, November.
    2. Heshmati, Almas & Kim, Jungsuk, 2014. "A Survey of the Role of Fiscal Policy in Addressing Income Inequality, Poverty Reduction and Inclusive Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 8119, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Sonali Jain-Chandra & Tidiane Kinda & Kalpana Kochhar & Shi Piao & Johanna Schauer, 2016. "Sharing the Growth Dividend; Analysis of Inequality in Asia," IMF Working Papers 16/48, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Gohar Samvel Sedrakyan & Laura Varela-Candamio, 2017. "The Impact of Public Expenditures on Economic Growth in Two Very Different Countries: A comparative Analysis of Armenia and Spain," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1702, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    5. Zheng Jian & Daniel Jeongdae, 2017. "Prospects for progressive tax reform in Asia and the Pacific," MPDD Working Paper Series WP/17/08, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP).

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