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The Value of Don Bradman: Additional Revenue in Australian Ashes Tests

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  • Julian Blackham
  • Bruce Chapman

Abstract

One way to understand the value of sporting ‘superstars’ is to examine the effect they have on match attendances and revenue. Arguably, the most famous sports star in Australia was Sir Donald Bradman, whose batting average has far exceeded that of any cricket players. This paper examines the value of Don Bradman by estimating an empirical model of the effect of Bradman on cricket match attendances for Ashes Test matches in Australia. The attendance effect – of over 7,000 additional people each day on which he batted – is then used to derive an estimate of the effect on revenue. We find that Bradman generated considerable additional revenue, though the range of the estimates is very large. The Australian Cricket Board, as the monopoly supplier of cricket, was able to obtain all the extra proceeds.

Suggested Citation

  • Julian Blackham & Bruce Chapman, 2004. "The Value of Don Bradman: Additional Revenue in Australian Ashes Tests," CEPR Discussion Papers 480, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:480
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    File URL: https://www.cbe.anu.edu.au/researchpapers/cepr/DP480.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Baimbridge, Mark & Cameron, Samuel & Dawson, Peter, 1996. "Satellite Television and the Demand for Football: A Whole New Ball Game?," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 43(3), pages 317-333, August.
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    3. Mita Bhattacharya & Russell Smyth, 2003. "The Game is Not the Same: The Demand for Test Match Cricket in Australia," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(1), pages 77-90, March.
    4. Idson, Todd L & Kahane, Leo H, 2000. "Team Effects on Compensation: An Application to Salary Determination in the National Hockey League," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 38(2), pages 345-357, April.
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    6. J. C. H. Jones & J. A. Schofield & D. E. A. Giles, 2000. "Our fans in the north: the demand for British Rugby League," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(14), pages 1877-1887.
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    Cited by:

    1. Das, Satya Prasanna, 2008. "Game of Organizing International Cricket: Co-Existence of Country-Line and Club-Line Games," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 2, pages 1-29.
    2. Mishra, Vinod & Smyth, Russell, 2010. "An examination of the impact of India's performance in one-day cricket internationals on the Indian stock market," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 319-334, June.
    3. Abhinav Sacheti & David Paton & Ian Gregory-Smith, 2016. "An Economic Analysis of Attendance Demand for One Day International Cricket," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(296), pages 121-136, March.
    4. John K. Wilson & Richard Pomfret, 2014. "Public Policy and Professional Sports," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 15381.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumer economics; Monopoly; Wages and compensation; Professional labour markets and occupations;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D42 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Monopoly
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations

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