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Prospect Agents and the Feedback Effect on Price Fluctuations

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  • Yipeng Yang
  • Allanus Tsoi

Abstract

A microeconomic approach is proposed to derive the fluctuations of risky asset price, where the market participants are modeled as prospect trading agents. As asset price is generated by the temporary equilibrium between demand and supply, the agents' trading behaviors can affect the price process in turn, which is called the feedback effect. The prospect agents make actions based on their reactions to gains and losses, and as a consequence of the feedback effect, a relationship between the agents' trading behavior and the price fluctuations is constructed, which explains the implied volatility skew and smile observed in actual market.

Suggested Citation

  • Yipeng Yang & Allanus Tsoi, 2013. "Prospect Agents and the Feedback Effect on Price Fluctuations," Papers 1308.6759, arXiv.org, revised Jan 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1308.6759
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    References listed on IDEAS

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