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Liquidity Trap and Stability of Taylor Rules

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Abstract

We study a productive economy with safe government bonds and fractional cash-in-advance constraint on consumption expenditures. Government issues bonds and levies taxes to finance public expenditures, while the Central Bank follows a feedback Taylor rules by pegging the nominal interest rate. We show that when the nominal interest rate is bound to be non-negative, under active policy rules a liquidity trap steady state does emerge besides the Leeper (1991) equilibrium. The stability of the two steady states depends, in turns, upon the amplitude of the liquidity constraint. When the share of consumption to be paid cash is set lower than one half, the liquidity trap equilibrium is unstable. The stability of Leeper equilibrium too depends dramatically upon the amplitude of the liquidity constraint. Policy and Taylor rules are thus theoretically rehabilitated since their targets, by contrast with a vast literature, may be now stable. We also show that a relaxation of the liquidity constraint is Pareto-improving and that the liquidity trap equilibrium Pareto-dominates the Leeper one, in view of the zero cost of money.

Suggested Citation

  • Antoine Le Riche & Francesco Magris & Antoine Parent, 2016. "Liquidity Trap and Stability of Taylor Rules," AMSE Working Papers 1617, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France, revised 06 May 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:aim:wpaimx:1617
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Daria ONORI & Francesco MAGRIS & Antoine LE RICHE, 2017. "Monetary Rules in a Two-Sector Endogenous Growth Model with Cash-in-Advance Constraint," LEO Working Papers / DR LEO 2504, Orleans Economics Laboratory / Laboratoire d'Economie d'Orleans (LEO), University of Orleans.

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    Keywords

    Cash-in-Advance; Liquidity Trap; Monetary Policy; Multiple Equilibria.;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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