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The GDP per capita of the Mexican regions (1895-1930): new estimates

Author

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  • José Aguilar-Retureta

    () (Universitat de Barcelona,Barcelona,Spain)

Abstract

So far, apart from Appendini (1972) for 1900, there were no Mexican regional GDP estimates for the period before 1930. The aim of this paper is to fill this gap by presenting new Mexican regional GDP pc estimates for several benchmark years between 1895 and 1930. The paper presents the methodology and sources used to estimate the new series, compares them with the previous estimates, and offers a first long-term picture of Mexican regional pc GDPs (1895-2010).

Suggested Citation

  • José Aguilar-Retureta, 2014. "The GDP per capita of the Mexican regions (1895-1930): new estimates," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1415, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
  • Handle: RePEc:ahe:dtaehe:1415
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Esquivel, Gerardo, 1999. "Convergencia regional en México, 1940-1995," El Trimestre Económico, Fondo de Cultura Económica, vol. 0(264), pages 725-761, : octubre.
    2. Martinez-Galarraga, Julio, 2012. "The determinants of industrial location in Spain, 1856–1929," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 255-275.
    3. Javier Sánchez‐Reaza & Andrés Rodríguez‐Pose, 2002. "The Impact of Trade Liberalization on Regional Disparities in Mexico," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(1), pages 72-90.
    4. Nicholas Crafts & Abay Mulatu, 2005. "What explains the location of industry in Britain, 1871–1931?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(4), pages 499-518, August.
    5. Hanson, Gordon H, 1998. "North American Economic Integration and Industry Location," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 30-44, Summer.
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    7. Hanson, Gordon H., 1998. "Regional adjustment to trade liberalization," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 419-444, July.
    8. Jacob Jordaan & Eduardo Rodriguez-Oreggia, 2012. "Regional growth in Mexico under trade liberalisation: how important are agglomeration and FDI?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 48(1), pages 179-202, February.
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    10. Rosés, Joan Ramón & Martínez-Galarraga, Julio & Tirado, Daniel A., 2010. "The upswing of regional income inequality in Spain (1860-1930)," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 244-257, April.
    11. Chiquiar, Daniel, 2005. "Why Mexico's regional income convergence broke down," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 257-275, June.
    12. Leonardo Monasterio & Eustáquio Reis, 2008. "Mudanças na Concentração Espacial das Ocupações nas Atividades Manufatureiras no Brasil – 1872-1920," Discussion Papers 1361, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
    13. Felice, Emanuele, 2009. "Regional value added in Italy (1891-2001) : estimates, elaborations," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp09-08, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    14. Emanuele Felice, 2011. "Regional value added in Italy, 1891–2001, and the foundation of a long‐term picture," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(3), pages 929-950, August.
    15. Badia-Miró, Marc & Guilera, Jordi & Lains, Pedro, 2012. "Regional Incomes in Portugal: Industrialisation, Integration and Inequality, 1890-1980," Revista de Historia Económica, Cambridge University Press, vol. 30(02), pages 225-244, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Emanuele Felice, 2015. "La stima e l’interpretazione dei divari regionali nel lungo periodo: i risultati principali e alcune tracce di ricerca," SCIENZE REGIONALI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(3), pages 91-120.
    2. José Aguilar-Retureta, 2015. "Regional income distribution in Mexico: new long-term evidence, 1895-2010," UB Economics Working Papers 2015/323, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB Economics.
    3. Emanuele Felice, 2017. "The Roots of a Dual Equilibrium: GDP, Productivity and Structural Change in the Italian Regions in the Long-run (1871-2011)," Quaderni di storia economica (Economic History Working Papers) 40, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    4. José Aguilar Retureta, 2016. "Explaining regional inequality from the periphery: The mexican case, 1900-2000," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1608, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    5. Marc Badia-Miró, 2015. "The evolution of the location of economic activity in Chile in the long run: a paradox of extreme concentration in absence of agglomeration economies," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 42(2 Year 20), pages 143-167, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Palabras clave: Mexican Regional GDP; Regional Inequalities; Economic History Growth.;

    JEL classification:

    • N16 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • N96 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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