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What explains the location of industry in Britain, 1871–1931?

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  • Nicholas Crafts
  • Abay Mulatu

Abstract

Where transport costs were falling, were the new economic geography forces for industry agglomeration and dispersion at work in the location of industry in pre-1931 Britain? This paper examines the issue empirically using a general model that nests the Heckscher-Ohlin factor endowment with new economic geography models. The evidence suggests that while the location of pre-1931 British industry was mainly driven by the former, the scale economies aspect of the latter also played a role. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas Crafts & Abay Mulatu, 2005. "What explains the location of industry in Britain, 1871–1931?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(4), pages 499-518, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jecgeo:v:5:y:2005:i:4:p:499-518
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    Cited by:

    1. José Aguilar-Retureta, 2014. "The GDP per capita of the Mexican regions (1895-1930): new estimates," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1415, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    2. Julio Martinez-Galarraga & Daniel A. Tirado & Rafael González-Val, 2015. "Market potential and regional economic growth in Spain (1860–1930)," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(4), pages 335-358.
    3. Rafael Henrique Moraes Pereira & Vanessa Nadalin & Leonardo Monasterio & Pedro Henrique Melo Albuquerque, 2012. "Quantifying Urban Centrality: A Simple Index Proposal and International Comparison," Discussion Papers 1675a, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
    4. Rafael González-Val & Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat & Elisabet Viladecans-Marsal, 2017. "Market potential and city growth: Spain 1860–1960," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), pages 31-61.
    5. Julio Martínez-Galarraga & Elisenda Paluzie & Jordi Pons & Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat, 2008. "Agglomeration and labour productivity in Spain over the long term," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 2(3), pages 195-212, October.
    6. Stuetzer, Michael & Obschonka, Martin & Audretsch, David B. & Wyrwich, Michael & Rentfrow, Peter J. & Coombes, Mike & Shaw-Taylor, Leigh & Satchell, Max, 2016. "Industry structure, entrepreneurship, and culture: An empirical analysis using historical coalfields," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 52-72.
    7. José Aguilar-Retureta, 2015. "Regional income distribution in Mexico: new long-term evidence, 1895-2010," UB Economics Working Papers 2015/323, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB Economics.
    8. Leunig, Timothy, 2006. "Time is Money: A Re-Assessment of the Passenger Social Savings from Victorian British Railways," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(03), pages 635-673, September.
    9. Reyer Gerlagh, Nicole A. Mathys and Thomas O. Michielsen, 2015. "Energy Abundance, Trade and Specialization," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3).
    10. Tim Leunig, 2011. "Cart or Horse: Transport and Economic Growth," International Transport Forum Discussion Papers 2011/4, OECD Publishing.
    11. Henning, Martin & Enflo, Kerstin & Andersson, Fredrik N.G., 2011. "Trends and cycles in regional economic growth," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 538-555.
    12. PICARD, Pierre M. & ZENG, Dao-Zhi, 2006. "Industrial location : a synthesis of Chamberlin and Ricardo," CORE Discussion Papers 2006055, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    13. José Aguilar Retureta, 2016. "Explaining regional inequality from the periphery: The mexican case, 1900-2000," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1608, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    14. Pierre M. Picard & Dao‐Zhi Zeng, 2010. "A Harmonization Of First And Second Natures," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(5), pages 973-994, December.
    15. Abay Mulatu & Ada Wossink, 2014. "Environmental Regulation and Location of Industrialized Agricultural Production in Europe," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 90(3), pages 509-537.
    16. Nicholas Crafts, 2005. "Market potential in British regions, 1871-1931," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(9), pages 1159-1166.
    17. Julio Martínez-Galarraga, 2014. "Market potential estimates in history: a survey of methods and an application to Spain, 1867-1930," Working Papers 0051, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    18. Martinez-Galarraga, Julio, 2012. "The determinants of industrial location in Spain, 1856–1929," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 255-275.
    19. Julio Martinez Galarraga & Elisenda Paluzie Hernandez & Jordi Pons Novell & Daniel Aurelio Tirado Fabregat, 2007. "Agglomeration and labour productivity in Spanish industry: a long-term analysis," Working Papers in Economics 175, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    20. Canfei He & Xiyan Mao, 2016. "Population dynamics and regional development in China," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 9(3), pages 535-549.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N23 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe

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