IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/uneewp/12939.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Explaining Market and Enterprise Structures in the Food Marketing Chain

Author

Listed:
  • Nightingale, John J.
  • Piggott, Roley R.
  • Griffith, Garry R.

Abstract

Our objective in this paper is to review the origins and main points of theories of firm behaviour used in economic theory and strategic management, with particular reference to the food marketing chain. We argue that while neoclassical economics may provide a robust framework in which to understand market outcomes for long run atomistic competition, such as conventionally modelled by agricultural economists, modern developments in both economics and strategic management add substantially to our ability to explain firm and market structures in the food marketing chain.

Suggested Citation

  • Nightingale, John J. & Piggott, Roley R. & Griffith, Garry R., 2002. "Explaining Market and Enterprise Structures in the Food Marketing Chain," Working Papers 12939, University of New England, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uneewp:12939
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/12939
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Griffith, G.R., 2000. "Competition in the Food Marketing Chain," 2000 Conference (44th), January 23-25, 2000, Sydney, Australia 171911, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    2. R. E. Caves & M. E. Porter, 1977. "From Entry Barriers to Mobility Barriers: Conjectural Decisions and Contrived Deterrence to New Competition," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 91(2), pages 241-261.
    3. Winter, S. G. & Kaniovski, Y. M. & Dosi, G., 2000. "Modeling industrial dynamics with innovative entrants," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 255-293, September.
    4. Brian J. Loasby, 2000. "Market institutions and economic evolution," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 297-309.
    5. Geoffrey M. Hodgson, 2002. "Darwinism in economics: from analogy to ontology," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 259-281.
    6. Griffith, Garry R., 2000. "Competition in the food marketing chain," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 44(3), September.
    7. Stanley C. Hollander & Kathleen M. Rassuli (ed.), 1993. "Marketing," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, volume 0, number 512.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industrial Organization; Marketing;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:uneewp:12939. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deuneau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.