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Transshipment in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Andriamananjara, Soamiely
  • Arce, Hugh M.
  • Ferrantino, Michael J.

Abstract

Data representing transshipment or re-exports are almost always excluded from analytical portrayals of international trade, yet transshipment is potentially an important phenomenon in understanding a number of economic questions, and is increasing in importance. Rapid technological change in areas such as containerization and hub-and-spoke routing has promoted the practice of transshipment. While there are significant gaps in the data, the share of re-exports in global exports has undoubtedly increased rapidly, from perhaps 1 in 20 in the mid- 1980s to perhaps 1 in 6 today. Econometric analysis of U.S. domestic exports and foreign exports (re-exports) over pairs of U.S. ports and destinations suggests that re-exports are significantly more sensitive than domestic exports to factors influencing transaction costs, including distance, containerization, price-fixing liner agreements, and port efficiency and restrictive port policies in the importing country.

Suggested Citation

  • Andriamananjara, Soamiely & Arce, Hugh M. & Ferrantino, Michael J., 2004. "Transshipment in the United States," Working Papers 15871, United States International Trade Commission, Office of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uitcoe:15871
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/15871
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carsten Fink & Aaditya Mattoo & Ileana Cristina Neagu, 2002. "Trade in International Maritime Services: How Much Does Policy Matter?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(1), pages 81-108, June.
    2. Clark, Ximena & Dollar, David & Micco, Alejandro, 2004. "Port efficiency, maritime transport costs, and bilateral trade," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 417-450, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Raymond Fisman & Peter Moustakerski & Shang-Jin Wei, 2008. "Outsourcing Tariff Evasion: A New Explanation for Entrepôt Trade," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(3), pages 587-592, August.
    2. Martijn J. Burger & Mark J. P. M. Thissen & Frank G. van Oort & Dario Diodato, 2014. "The Magnitude and Distance Decay of Trade in Goods and Services: New Evidence for European Countries," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(3), pages 231-259, September.
    3. Ferrantino, Michael J. & Wang, Zhi, 2008. "Accounting for discrepancies in bilateral trade: The case of China, Hong Kong, and the United States," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 502-520, September.
    4. Productivity Commission, 2005. "Review of Part X of the Trade Practices Act 1974: International Liner Cargo Shipping," Inquiry Reports, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia, number 32.
    5. Jackie M.L. Chan, 2015. "Trade Intermediation, Financial Frictions, and the Gains from Trade," Discussion Papers 15-009, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    6. Sudhakar Kota & Nizar Sahawneh, 2011. "Trends In Commodity Flows In Uae," Journal of Global Business and Economics, Global Research Agency, vol. 3(1), pages 87-100, July.

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    Keywords

    International Relations/Trade;

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