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Wic And The Nutrient Intake Of Children

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  • Oliveira, Victor
  • Gundersen, Craig

Abstract

After controlling for self-selection bias, participation in the WIC program (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children) has a significant positive effect on children's intakes of iron, folate, and vitamin B-6. Iron is one of the five nutrients targeted by the program, the others being protein, calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C. Folate and vitamin B-6, along with zinc, were recommended by a 1991 USDA study as nutrients that the program should also target. The data set used, the 1994-96 Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals, reflects the dramatic increase during the 1990's in the number of children in the program.

Suggested Citation

  • Oliveira, Victor & Gundersen, Craig, 2000. "Wic And The Nutrient Intake Of Children," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33803, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersfa:33803
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/33803
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", pages 129-137.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Fox, Mary Kay & Hamilton, William L. & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2004. "Effects Of Food Assistance And Nutrition Programs On Nutrition And Health: Volume 4, Executive Summary Of The Literature Review," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33871, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Michele Ploeg, 2009. "Do Benefits of U.S. Food Assistance Programs for Children Spillover to Older Children in the Same Household?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 412-427, December.
    3. Christina Robinson, 2013. "Younger Siblings Can Be Good for Your Health: An Examination of Spillover Benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 172-184, June.
    4. Carlson, Andrea & Senauer, Benjamin, 2002. "Estimating The Effect Of The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program For Women, Infants And Children (Wic) On Children'S Health," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19762, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    5. Ishdorj, Ariun & Jensen, Helen H. & Tobias, Justin, 2007. "Intra-Household Allocation and Consumption of WIC-Approved Foods: A Bayesian Approach," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12833, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Rachel Dunifon & Lori Kowaleski-Jones, 2001. "Associations Between Participation in the National School Lunch Program, Food Insecurity, and Child Well-Being," JCPR Working Papers 249, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    7. Yen, Steven T., 2010. "The effects of SNAP and WIC programs on nutrient intakes of children," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 576-583, December.
    8. Janet Currie, 2003. "U.S. Food and Nutrition Programs," NBER Chapters,in: Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, pages 199-290 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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